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In this answer, it is explained that the space probes RTG's are not installed until a couple days before launch because of the heat those things generate.

Now I'm curious about the Apollo RTGs. From the link in this answer, we learn that those RTGs where assembled on the Moon after arrival, but the casket containing the plutonium (which is the actual heat emitting thing) traveled there attached to the LEM.

Where those caskets installed also a couple of days before launch? Was there a hatch ready for this? Where those, perhaps, much smaller than the newer ones?

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    $\begingroup$ related: What were the uses of the RTGs in the Apollo spacecrafts? and some Apollo RTG photos in this answer. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Oct 27 at 14:10
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    $\begingroup$ There is a really great timeline with a lot of pictures on the Wikipedia article from the previous link. There may also be a (pedantic) point of emphasis here. There was never a functioning RTG on Apollo. There were RTG elements (unfueled and not put together) and plutonium fuel. They were not combined and installed until the crew was outside on the surface of moon. $\endgroup$ – mothman Oct 27 at 14:27
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    $\begingroup$ @mothman I have rephrased the question to try and pedantic-proof it ;-) $\endgroup$ – Diego Sánchez Oct 27 at 15:12
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Partial answer (everything but exactly when in the timeline it was done):

The fuel capsule was installed at the launch pad "through a ten-inch access port in the spacecraft structure". The fabulous document ALSEP Flight System Familiarization Manual includes this info and much, much more.

The only time given is "after the LM has been fueled". (page 4-5)

KSC Fuel Cask and Fuel Capsule Installation.

The fuel cask and mounting structure assembly is transported to the work platform at SLA and is mounted on the LM structure after the LM has been fueled.

The radioactive and hot (1200°F) fuel capsule is transported to the SLA work platform, inserted into the fuel cask in the upright position, and locked in place using the SLA handling tool.

SLA = Spacecraft Launch Adapter

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    $\begingroup$ Enough Pu-238 for, apparently, 70W (compared to Voyager's "470 W at 30 volts DC"). How much Pu is that? (..... Also, this "Moon landing hoax" project really went into incredible levels of detail! It could be they went so far as to actually land on the Moon for a perfect, ironclad Moon landing hoax! More funding is needed for research.) $\endgroup$ – David Tonhofer Oct 28 at 18:28
  • $\begingroup$ @DavidTonhofer I ran through some calculations and found that 70W and 100% thermal to electrical efficiency would give you a quarter pound of Pu-238, which is a nice burger-relatable number. But then I found the exact page which says it's about 3.8 kg en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… $\endgroup$ – llama Oct 28 at 18:51
  • $\begingroup$ @DavidTonhofer it cost billions of dollars to write all these fake documents. $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble Oct 28 at 18:57

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