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When lunar rock is heated to 600 °C to extract Helium-3, are gases expelled other than helium? Inductance process would be used in heating the rock.

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    $\begingroup$ For induction heating you need a conductive material. A metal, not metal oxides. Some hydrogen may be expelled too. $\endgroup$ – Uwe Feb 21 '20 at 9:57
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Lunar regolith may contain not only the lightest noble gas helium, but also hydrogen and other noble gases like neon, argon, krypton and xenon. The concentration of helium is much higher than that of the other noble gases.

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More than 99 % of lunar soil are oxides of silicon and some metals like iron and aluminum, see table 7.15 on page 62 of the Pdf.

Source THE LUNAR REGOLITH, lunar sourcebook.

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    $\begingroup$ At 600 Celsius hydrates would release water, carbonates would release carbon dioxide, nitrates would release oxygen and even nitrogen dioxide, chlorates and perchlorates would release oxygen and chlorine oxides and so on. Such high temperature would decompose many inorganic salts and vaporizer others, therefore not only solar wind gases would be released. $\endgroup$ – WOW 6EQUJ5 Feb 21 '20 at 15:27
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    $\begingroup$ @WOW6EQUJ5 But does lunar regolith contain hydrates, carbonates, nitrates and chlorates? $\endgroup$ – Uwe Feb 21 '20 at 15:49
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    $\begingroup$ The link in this answer doesn't mention hydrates, carbonates, nitrates, or chlorates. The minerals in lunar regolith appear to be only ferro-aluminosilicates. $\endgroup$ – WaterMolecule Feb 21 '20 at 21:59
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    $\begingroup$ Presence of ClO3, ClO4, NO3 is confirmed in lunar regolith pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70187118, existence of hydrates in form of clathrate hydrates is speculated based on findings of Lunar Prospector mission researchgate.net/publication/…, as far of carbonates at least one mineral - Aragonite is confirmed in lunar soil adsabs.harvard.edu/full/1974LPI.....5..264G. In link in the answer some lunar soil samples have sulfur which boils at 444,6 degrees of Celsius. $\endgroup$ – WOW 6EQUJ5 Feb 22 '20 at 11:40
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    $\begingroup$ From Wikipedia : "Calcium carbonate exists in equilibrium with calcium oxide and carbon dioxide at any temperature. At each temperature there is a partial pressure of carbon dioxide that is in equilibrium with calcium carbonate. At room temperature the equilibrium overwhelmingly favors calcium carbonate, because the equilibrium CO2 pressure is only a tiny fraction of the partial CO2 pressure in air, which is about 0.035 kPa." If calcium carbonate exists in a vacuum, carbon dioxide would outgas at fairly low temp. $\endgroup$ – Uwe Feb 22 '20 at 16:27

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