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With these orbital configurations,

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enter image description here source-Bing

leaving Earth on Aug 16, 2106 and arriving on Mars October 10,2106, what is the lowest continuously-applied acceleration that can make what is sometimes loosely referred to as a 'Brachistochrone transfer starting at this date/orbital configuration and ending on this date

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  • $\begingroup$ I've just added a bit more to my 2017 answer to Brachistochrone variation for Earth-to-Mars Orbit. I think you're aiming for something a bit different here, could you edit your question to make the distinction clearer? If you feel your question is answered there, you could also vote your own question to be duplicate, but editing this to highlight the differences would be more fun! $\endgroup$ – uhoh Mar 14 at 3:16
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    $\begingroup$ I think the question comes down to, "what is the lowest continuously-applied acceleration that can make this transfer starting at this date/orbital configuration and ending on this date". $\endgroup$ – ikrase Mar 15 at 0:06
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    $\begingroup$ @ikrase I agree, I think the question should be edited and that made clear, and the use of "Brachistochrone transfer" be modified to "This is sometimes loosely referred to as a 'Brachistochrone transfer.'" I think this is a great orbital mechanics question! $\endgroup$ – uhoh Mar 17 at 3:03
  • $\begingroup$ @uhoh Should I edit it for the op then? $\endgroup$ – ikrase Mar 17 at 3:32
  • $\begingroup$ @ikrase Bob516 is quite an active and experienced user with 100+ posts so probably can decide for themselsves. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Mar 17 at 5:06

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