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I'm looking to make a physical lunar regolith stimulant at home. I don't care about chemical composition, color, or anything like that, but I'd like it to behave similarly to actual lunar regolith in terms of compressability, angle of repose, etc.

Are there any instructions or guides on how to do this with household materials (eg. 200g flour, 100g fine sand, etc)?

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  • $\begingroup$ Is that to behave similarly under Earth conditions as real regolith performs under lunar conditions? $\endgroup$ – JCRM Mar 22 at 12:19
  • $\begingroup$ @JCRM yes, I'd like to test things like rover wheels and collection shovels here on Earth $\endgroup$ – Dragongeek Mar 22 at 12:22
  • $\begingroup$ answers to Is lunar regolith available for purchase? do not answer your question, but it's possible that some of the links may contain some useful information $\endgroup$ – uhoh Mar 23 at 0:49
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The best bet is to get volcanic sand, which tends to have the rougher texture that is common on the Moon. Specifically, the base component to most NASA regolith stimulants is basaltic ash with a high glass content.

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During the development of Lunokhod, an Armenian volcanic pumice (gray color) was used as a cover for the test track. Lunadrom for training the crew of the Lunokhod was covered with Crimean shell rock (yellow color).

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