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Let's say someone who was conceived and born in microgravity and spent his/her entire life on a space station in weightlessness until age 20 decides to land on a celestial body. How much surface gravity would such a celestial body have to have for the human to get accustomed to it? Such a human obviously cannot land on any of the four inner planets where he/she would probably die instantly since his/her bones would break. However the human still has some strength because he/she might have moved more massive things sometimes, for instance.

What if such a person would try to land on Lutetia in 0.003g or Ceres in 0.029g or Pluto in 0.063g? What would happen to him/her?

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    $\begingroup$ What are your opinion on rat babies in space? I feel like a lot of the interesting things observed in rats raised from birth in space may also apply to humans. In addition to that, we're closely observing astronaut health; watch an astronaut take their first few steps when they land (or not). Now imagine a baby who can't exercise existing in space for a long time. They may not develop the basic musculature to even manage to hold their heads up in 1g, 0.5g or possibly even less. $\endgroup$ – Magic Octopus Urn Apr 22 '20 at 11:52
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    $\begingroup$ -1 and I've voted to close because "This question is likely to be answered with opinions rather than facts and citations. It should be updated so it will lead to fact-based answers." There are not going to be any fact-based and sourced answers about humans who are "conceived and born in microgravity and spent their entire life on a space station in weightlessness until age 20". While this is an intriguing topic, it's not suitable for this Stack Exchange site. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Apr 22 '20 at 12:37
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    $\begingroup$ @user30007 well i guess you might want to check out someplace like Worldbuilding if its getting closed here $\endgroup$ – Topcode Apr 22 '20 at 13:24
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    $\begingroup$ @Topcode Worldbuilding depends a lot on unobtanium. I would move this to a medical or biomechanical group if there is such a thing. $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Apr 22 '20 at 14:41
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    $\begingroup$ @user30007 I don't like voting to close questions and I'm sorry to vtc this one, but the close reason is "This question is likely to be answered with opinions rather than facts and citations. It should be updated so it will lead to fact-based answers." Again, There are not going to be any fact-based and sourced answers about humans who are "conceived and born in microgravity and spent their entire life on a space station in weightlessness until age 20". Answers would be pure speculation and therefore no appropriate as Stack Exchange answers. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Apr 23 '20 at 2:10