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Has the surface of Mars been observed by the mirror of Hubble ? For example, it could be a good idea for humans to be able to see the lovely Curiosity Rover via Hubble from above.

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    $\begingroup$ Hi Merlin. I feel like this is a very googlable question. Learn to use google. "Hubble image Mars" immediately gives results. Furthermore you cannot see rovers via Hubble. Its resolution power is not sufficient. You need to be a satellite in orbit around Mars to do what you propose. $\endgroup$ – AtmosphericPrisonEscape May 11 at 13:43
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    $\begingroup$ " The Apollo descent stages left on the lunar surface are too small to be seen by Hubble, which can see objects as small as 60-75 yards, about three-quarters the length of a soccer field. The left-behind descent stages are only about the size of a small truck." -- Curiosity is smaller than the LM descent stage, and much further away $\endgroup$ – JCRM May 11 at 13:49
  • $\begingroup$ Greetings to you and thank you for your answer. Yes, Google is definitely a good tool for asking questions, but I can never find a person like you who is knowledgeable and kind and knowledgeable on Google, and I have the exact answer. 🌺 $\endgroup$ – Merlin May 11 at 13:51
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    $\begingroup$ It would be a waste to target Mars (or the Moon) with Hubble, since very good surface maps of each have been obtained from the various orbiters launched over the decades. The Viking orbiters for example arrived in the '70s and produced much better Mars imagery than anything Hubble could do. There are currently six operational Mars orbiters. $\endgroup$ – antlersoft May 11 at 14:56
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    $\begingroup$ @antlersoft: Hubble is occasionally used for Mars observations. It has instruments that the orbiters don't and can view an entire hemisphere at once with them, rather than a closeup of a patch of ground: hubblesite.org/images/gallery/62-mars $\endgroup$ – Christopher James Huff May 11 at 15:53
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Hubble is occasionally used for Mars observations. It has instruments that the orbiters don't and can view an entire hemisphere at once with them, rather than a closeup of a patch of ground: https://hubblesite.org/images/gallery/62-mars

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