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From when the astronauts board the Crew Dragon launch vehicle to docking with ISS is around 22 hours.

Are the astronauts going to remain immobile through the duration of flight? How do astronauts manage trips like this (in terms of things such as feeding themselves and attending to nature's call)? Are there things which are done differently in this vehicle?

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    $\begingroup$ Why do you assume they have to "hold without any physical movement for such a long time without any movement?" They can unstrap as soon as they are in orbit. $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble May 27 at 20:37
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    $\begingroup$ As far I know, they can move already if they are in weightlessness. That is about 10 minutes after the launch. But there is not too much place there. Btw, did you travel with plane/bus/train far away? Well, it is not very funny, but we can survive. They are trained for that long ago, and in exchange, they can go to the space. $\endgroup$ – peterh - Reinstate Monica May 27 at 20:38
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    $\begingroup$ Humans have been through worse. $\endgroup$ – user3528438 May 27 at 21:58
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    $\begingroup$ Several airlines, some of which are US-based airlines that are widely rated as amongst the least comfortable airlines, have nonstop flights that are over 16 hours long. Ughh. In the age of sailing, several European countries had ships that transported paying customers in conditions that would have made the worst airline of today shine. And those were paying customers. The conditions for non-paying customers (aka slaves) were far, far worse. $\endgroup$ – David Hammen May 27 at 22:37
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    $\begingroup$ Well, it Depends. $\endgroup$ – Dan May 28 at 14:11
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After the initial launch into orbit, the crew will be weightless, which will make things a little more comfortable. The Crew Dragon isn't as cramped as you might think; it has room for 4 crew members in the NASA configuration, so the crew will be able to move around a bit during the flight. Crew Dragon also has a toilet, according to this article (which also features a picture giving you a little more idea of the cabin space).

19 hours in a two-seat spacecraft is no big deal. Gemini 7 flew a two week long mission in a much less comfortable two-seater.

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    $\begingroup$ How does astronauts manage to feed themselves and take care of the nature's calls? $\endgroup$ – Nimesh Neema May 27 at 20:56
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    $\begingroup$ Gemini used diapers for shorter missions, not sure for the 14 day ones). $\endgroup$ – geoffc May 27 at 20:59
  • $\begingroup$ @geoffc Used diapers cause skin problems after some hours. Babies require diaper switch every some hours + after poo ASAP + baby cremes are partially against this. I suspect the plastic tasks are the most likely. $\endgroup$ – peterh - Reinstate Monica May 27 at 21:17
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    $\begingroup$ Gemini used a "roll-on-cuff-receiver urine-transfer assembly" for urine and "the Apollo fecal-collection system is the same as that used in the Gemini". Pee in a tube, poop in a bag. Source: NASA tech note D-6737. $\endgroup$ – DrSheldon May 27 at 21:33
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    $\begingroup$ Some additional info about the waste bags on Apollo; Gemini's equipment was very similar, but there was no privacy at all: did astronauts poop in front of each other? what were the pills added to solid waste? $\endgroup$ – Russell Borogove May 27 at 23:46
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Ironically, the Soyuz vehicle has been taking a 'faster' approach to the ISS of late. Used to be a 1-2 day mission, and the new faster approach (tested on Progress vehicles first) is only about 4 hours.

However, the 4 hour is less comfortable since they stay in the seats and suits the whole time, since there is not really enough time to get out, and get back in.

Whereas on the 2 day approach they can get out of the seats and move around.

Soyuz passengers are really folded tight into the seats, legs strapped tight. Dragon has more room in that regard. Easier to get in and out of the seats. (Dragon is designed for 7, flies for NASA with 4, and the first demo flight with just 2, so lots of room).

Soyuz has two modules (orbital and reentry) so there is privacy for a washroom.

There was a story about the toilet SpaceX is supplying but the take away from that is, its a surprise we will find out about after the mission.

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  • $\begingroup$ How does astronauts manage to feed themselves and take care of the nature's calls? $\endgroup$ – Nimesh Neema May 27 at 20:56
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    $\begingroup$ As I said, Soyuz has a toilet in the second module (some privacy). SpaceX has one they have yet to reveal. Food is in tubes/sacks/cans. Like on the ISS. No shower on board, but they can wash up on the ISS. $\endgroup$ – geoffc May 27 at 20:59
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They reportedly have a rudimentary toilet, even if SpaceX isn't talking about it. So the crew should be okay for the duration.

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