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According to Space.com's NASA's Curiosity rover starts Red Planet road trip up Martian mountain:

Curiosity's last stop from 2019 to this year was the "clay-bearing unit", another environment that was formed in water. Scientists are also interested in a feature between the clay unit and the sulfate unit, nicknamed the "Greenheugh pediment."

but now:

Curiosity is on its way to an area on the 3.4-mile-high (5.5 km) Mount Sharp (Aeolis Mons) nicknamed the "sulfate-bearing unit." Sulfates are usually formed around water as it evaporates, and these leftovers could provide more information about how the surface of Mars changed roughly three billion years ago, when the planet lost most of its atmosphere and running water was no longer possible on the surface.

Question: How much altitude will curiosity gain by its climb now from the "clay-bearing unit" to the "sulfate-bearing unit?"

related: Does the Curiosity rover really have a chance of driving to the top of Mt. Sharp?


NASA's Curiosity Mars rover discovered the goosebump-like features at the center of this image as it crested the slope of the Greenheugh Pediment on Feb. 24, 2020.

above: NASA's Curiosity Mars rover discovered the goosebump-like features at the center of this image as it crested the slope of the Greenheugh Pediment on Feb. 24, 2020. The textured ground likely formed by water billions of years ago. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

below: "This composite of 116 images captured by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows the path it will take in the summer of 2020 as it drives toward the next region it will be investigating, the "sulfate-bearing unit." (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)"

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