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This answer has pictures of the Enterprise shuttle, which was used for gliding and landing tests. One picture (included below) shows oxygen, hydrogen, and ammonia stored in "K-bottles". What is a K-bottle?

Enterprise top view

Source: Space Shuttle Orbiter Approach and Landing Test: Final Evaluation Report unannotated: https://i.stack.imgur.com/5v1e7.png

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There is a high pressure gas steel cylinder size K. Other MFG designations are 300, 49 and 1L.

The K-bottle has a diameter of 9.25 inches (235 mm) and a height of 60 inches (including valve and cap), 55 inches (1.397 m) without valve. The internal volume at 1 atm is 1.76 cubic feet (49 l). The U.S. DOT specification is 3AA2400. The service pressure is 2400 psi (165.4 bar). The weight is 139 lbs (63 kg).

Numbers from Wikipedia.

The k-bottles shown in the Shuttle drawing have the same typical ratio of diameter to height.

enter image description here

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Table from Advanced Specialty Gases

They used heavy ordinary standard industrial gas cylinders, no sophisticated lightweight carbon fiber overwrapped spherical gas containers. The Enterprise shuttle was used for gliding and landing tests only, so no rocket science gas containers.

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    $\begingroup$ It would be so much more exciting if it was Klein bottle. Wrong Enterprise, though $\endgroup$ – Matija Nalis Jul 20 '20 at 12:02
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    $\begingroup$ @MatijaNalis There is a Klein bottle standing above my computer desk. Made by a glassblower after I gave him a copy of a Scientificc American article about Klein bottles. $\endgroup$ – Uwe Jul 20 '20 at 12:19

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