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The Starfish Prime nuclear test on July 9, 1962 caused massive fluctuations and degradation of the Earth's magnetic field. This field is largely responsible for redirecting the Sun's solar radiation. We know that Mar's atmosphere was largely attenuated as a direct result of that planet's electromagnetic field degradation. This hypothesis is that a series of nuclear detonations in or above Venus's atmosphere would severely weaken that planets electromagnetic field allowing solar radiation to attenuate the atmosphere.

The attenuated material from Venus' atmosphere would create a temporary interplanetary "space haze" blocking solar radiation on the closest planet opposite the source of the solar radiation (Earth) when the orbits of the two planets are in optimum alignment. Is this feasible?

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    $\begingroup$ Since an answer to your question may require an understanding of what "space haze" is, can you explain a little more about what it is? $\endgroup$ – uhoh Jul 23 '20 at 4:48
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    $\begingroup$ Not really sure if there is a technical name for this hypothetical gaseous structure. If it could be created it might be similiar to a comet's tail but on a planetary scale. $\endgroup$ – Eric Lier Jul 23 '20 at 5:07
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    $\begingroup$ The basis for your question is wrong, the impact of those tests was not massive, and there was no atmospheric loss from them. $\endgroup$ – GdD Jul 23 '20 at 7:14
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    $\begingroup$ Did you stop to think what percentage of the time venus is anywhere near occulting the sun? $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Jul 23 '20 at 12:58
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While the earth's magnetic field was disturbed by the tests mentioned, I don't think there's any sign that the field as a whole was degraded, certainly not on a timescale that would materially affect atmospheric escape.

Venus already has no intrinsic magnetic field to be disrupted. The existing field is induced by the sun's effect on the planet. If it were removed by some mechanism, it would re-form.

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In addition to the problems already mentioned, Venus rarely passes between the Earth and the Sun, and when it does, it only lasts for a few hours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transit_of_Venus. That link also contains a good image that shows the difference in size between Venus and the Sun: the former is a tiny black dot compared to the latter. Any cooling effect would be minimal.

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  • $\begingroup$ Good argument, the Venus transit, only two times in every 243 years. I saw the transit of 2004, Venus was so tiny. $\endgroup$ – Uwe Jul 23 '20 at 9:56
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The attenuated material from Venus' atmosphere would create a temporary interplanetary "space haze" blocking solar radiation on the closest planet opposite the source of the solar radiation (Earth)

The Sun is so huge compared to the tiny rocket planets like Venus and Earth and the distances between them are so big compared to the diameters of the Sun and the rocky planets.

The material from Venus' atmosphere would spread so widely that it has no effect at all.

But even if you spread all the venusian atmosphere around the orbit of Venus it would not shade the Earth most of the time. Venus orbit has a different inclination than Earth, only two times each venusian year some of the spread atmosphere would be between Sun and Earth on a direct line.

The Sun contains 99.86% of the solar system's known mass. The four gas giants account for 99% of the remaining mass, but they are only 0.14 % of the solar system mass. The remaining rocky material together comprises less than 0.002% of the Solar System's total mass.

Venus mass is only a small part of that 0.002 % and the venusian atmosphere is again a small part of its total mass. So Venus mass is only 2.45 ppm (part per million) of the Sun's mass.

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