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When various civilizations practice religion, its usually linked to some monuments or holy sites in Earth. As an example in Christianity, its Bethlehem, in Judaism, its Jerusalem, in Islam, its Mecca, for Hinduism its, Varanasi etc.

Question: By colonizing Mars, would it mean that all the habitants of various faiths will now have face to one direction i.e towards the earth or the coordinates of Mars be unified with the coordinates of the earth in terms of longitude/latitude to represent relative location of the holy sites?

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    $\begingroup$ I think Islam may be unique in requiring adherents to face a particular direction when they pray - it certainly isn't the case in Christianity. I'd imagine if there are ever Muslims on Mars they'll just face Earth rather than trying to face a specific angle. $\endgroup$ – Snoopy Jul 24 '20 at 17:23
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    $\begingroup$ When Sultan Salman Al Saud flew on the shuttle, he did not try to face Mecca because it was impractical. npr.org/transcripts/137790385 $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble Jul 24 '20 at 17:34
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    $\begingroup$ @OrganicMarble, noted. So in general certain notions of religion diffuses when human start colonizing other planets, right. I think the concept of colonization alone brings a bigger question of religion being dependent to some extent upon the habitat. So festivities such as christmas, prayer timings will need to be relative to original habitat. $\endgroup$ – GENIVI-LEARNER Jul 24 '20 at 19:53
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    $\begingroup$ @Snoopy In medieval times some Christians in western Europe would face east (to aim for Jerusalem) when praying. I recall in Reynard the Fox (a medieval novel) a character turns towards the wrong direction and that's intended as a joke. $\endgroup$ – Speedphoenix Jul 24 '20 at 23:06
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    $\begingroup$ I’m voting to close this question because it's about religion and not space exploration. $\endgroup$ – GdD Jul 25 '20 at 15:17

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