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Noctilucent clouds are the highest clouds forming above the Earth, up in the mesosphere. They form in late spring / early summer and above latitudes closer to the poles. Was a sounding rocket ever sent through these exceptional clouds and did it film its flight through them? Afaik, there are cosmodromes in Norway, Sweden, Russia (Plesetsk and Vostochny) and Germany (Peenemünde) from where sounding rockets could reach noctilucent clouds at the time of the year they appear. Or did perhaps some reentering orbital spacecraft fly through noctilucent clouds and film their flight through them?

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  • $\begingroup$ That's rather specific, and may be better asked over at Earth Science $\endgroup$ – JCRM Aug 11 at 9:07
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Google is your friend. I heartily recommend using it as a first go.

Project Possum says:

Sounding rockets have provided in-situ observations and measurements of atmospheric constituents since 1962, when particle collectors revealed an abundance of particles of much greater size when the rocket penetrated a noctilucent cloud layer [Hemenway et al., 1964]. Later in 1982, the Cold Arctic Mesopause Project (CAMP) successfully mapped the temperature distribution of the summer mesopause [Philbrick et al., 1984]. Then in 1993, The NLC-93 rocket campaign at Esrange, Sweden, investigated the vertical structure of a noctilucent cloud layer in-situ, showing little vertical variation [Gumbel and Witt, 1998]. The question of particle size was further addressed in 1999 with the MIDAS-DROPPS rocket campaign, which used the scattering phase functions of NLCs through optical photometers [Gumbel et al., 2001]. Then in 2007, the PHOCUS rocket-borne experiment found no general difference between neutral and charged particles. [Hedin et al, 2007].

FWIW there are photos online which ISS crew took.

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    $\begingroup$ And how did you find that? I never heard of a "project possum". Thank you. $\endgroup$ – Giovanni Aug 11 at 12:22

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