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This article (google translated version) says that part of the geostationary orbit is allocated to Hungary (they are talking about 4°W).

Is there a map, which shows me which part of the orbit is allocated to which country?


If there is, I'll ask another question on how was the allocation done.

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    $\begingroup$ I don't think that's how it works. Probably Hungary's government had applied for a slot previously. This pdf explains how it works esoa.net/cms-data/positions/Sats_ITU.pdf Also see spacelegalissues.com/orbital-slots-and-space-congestion $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble Aug 18 at 15:19
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    $\begingroup$ @OrganicMarble: Please consider writing an answer to this question. You've already found some references. $\endgroup$ – DrSheldon Aug 19 at 4:21
  • $\begingroup$ @DrSheldon I'm not confident enough that this is correct to write an answer, hence my use of the phrase "I don't think..." And if I am correct, the question is unanswerable as written. $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble Aug 19 at 15:16
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While this is not a map, you can find relevant data in the International Telecommunication Union Radio Regulations and precisely in the appendix 30, 30A and 30B (see Volume Two). You will find several tables containing positions that have been allotted to countries. For example Hungary (country code HNG) has a location at 7.5° W (Appendix 30B) and at 12.8° W (Appendix 30A).

However, in this list, you will not find the 4° W for Hungary. This is because countries can ask for additional positions (see article 6 of Appendix 30B about additional systems for example). These positions are not given in the tables and are not (up to my knowledge) available publicly.

One important thing to note is that you can not emit at any frequency from your slot, but only at the frequencies given in the appendixes.

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