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Assuming that ROV-E could be employed in a real space mission, which would be the best configuration to store it in a larger spacecraft or linked to a larger spacecraft? Is it possible to modify the position of the wheels achieving a more compact configuration? I'm thinking to a mission concept similar to ExoMars (with ROV-E replacing Schiaparelli), but with lower mass and dimension. Which are the minimum dimension of ROV-E in a compact configuration during the Mars Orbit waiting for the right landing site?

Thank you for the help

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ROV-E is mad mostly with off-the-shelf parts. For example, ROV-E is riding on remote-control truck wheels. Its two 'brains' are easy-to-program Arduino and Raspberry pi computers. A lot of parts were made using a 3D printer. (from AskNasa)

Obviously, ROV-E is not built for a space mission. On the AskNasa site, they show a video of ROV-E in an inside test environment with sand and stones (similar to mars), however, I believe it would hardly endure a day in a real desert, not to speak of a flight to mars or a landing...

If, however, NASA decided to launch a bunch of (more shielded / enduring) little ROV-E builds, they would likely be stacked in a way that is impossible to achieve with their current hardware.

ROV-E is built as a small, detail-reduced, cheap version of Curiosity / Perseverance (which share many features). If you have a look at the Perseverance rover, you can see how its legs and wheels can be organized in a more compact way...

enter image description here

You would also have to implement that for ROV-Es in before transporting them to mars.

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