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The ISS crew celebrated Thanksgiving today.

Apparently the ISS uses Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), which is equivalent to Greenwich Mean Time.

What timezone would people use for interstellar travel?

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    $\begingroup$ just fixed my typo/wrong word. $\endgroup$ – CodingMatters Nov 27 '20 at 3:23
  • $\begingroup$ looks good, thanks! $\endgroup$ – uhoh Nov 27 '20 at 3:39
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    $\begingroup$ Interstellar travel is speculative enough that it's difficult to give an answer to this. $\endgroup$ – ikrase Nov 27 '20 at 5:17
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I suspect any interstellar travel will have relativistic effects (it's a factor of even interplanetary travel), the only reasonable timezones are EMET and OMET -- Experienced and Observed Mission Elapsed Times which would have the departure date as its epoch. When these timezones are converted (by adding the epoch) EMET would be somewhat earlier than Zulu time, and OMET would be significantly later.

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I think it will be either UTC(If international) Or the country's command center time zone, as the Space Shuttle, Mercury, Apollo, and other USA missions had Houston Time, and Russian missions, like Vostok, Luna and other Russian missions used Mission Control time zone. So here are the answers I think:

  1. International will have UTC
  2. 1 country missions will have Mission Control time.

Sources: In the book "Spaceman" By Massimo he described how he used houston time aboard the space shuttle, as his EVA was in the morning.

Other spacecraft are from book The NASA archives book(USA), other books by astronauts(Russian), and Movie "Living In Space" about the iss by astronauts(ISS).

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    $\begingroup$ Can you provide a reference showing that shuttle missions used Houston time onboard? $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble Nov 29 '20 at 1:56
  • $\begingroup$ In the book "Spaceman" By Massimo he described how he used houston time aboard the space shuttle, as his EVA was in the morning. $\endgroup$ – Leo Nov 29 '20 at 20:02
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    $\begingroup$ @OrganicMarble - I suspect Leo is using "used" in the context of when the crew were scheduled to sleep, eat, work, etc., as opposed to "used" in the context of the Earth-based time system used to coordinate these activities, timetag data and commands, etc. When launch time and landing time allowed it, non-ISS shuttle flights tended to have the crew's daily cycle be in sync with time in Houston rather than time in Greenwich. $\endgroup$ – David Hammen Nov 30 '20 at 12:03
  • $\begingroup$ Other spacecraft are from book The NASA archives book(USA), other books by astronauts(Russian), and Movie "Living In Space" about the iss by astronauts(ISS). These are all credible sources. I dont get why is this voted down. $\endgroup$ – Leo Nov 30 '20 at 23:09
  • $\begingroup$ @Leo Sources need to be included in the text of the answer itself, not in comments. Comments on Stack Exchange are temporary. $\endgroup$ – called2voyage Dec 1 '20 at 16:30

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