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I want to access satellites' orbital parameters like inclination, right ascension of ascending node and argument of perigee. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to find this information.

Is there a database where I can access this information?

Edit:

I want to access these knowledes because it is my search homework and orbital elements of satellite are wanted. After, I got the these knowledges I try to draw ground track of satellite.

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    $\begingroup$ TLEs have information that is pretty close to but not exactly what you are looking for. There are many questions and answers about them here already. Those numbers are good enough for statistical analysis like seeing how satellites are distributed in various orbits or plotting them graphically, but for precise orbit calculations of individual satellites you need SGP4 for accuracy because... $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Jan 2, 2021 at 0:31
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    $\begingroup$ Earth's gravity is lumpy and there's atmospheric drag. Celestrak is the one-stop-shopping outlet for TLEs, but then you can go on to join Space-Track and follow the rules there. The more you can add to your question post about what you'd like to do, the more helpful an answer can be written for you. These comments are just to get you started but I think someone will write up a better answer, or point you to a specific existing answer that will answer your question after you've clarified with some details. Thanks! $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Jan 2, 2021 at 0:35
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    $\begingroup$ Firstly thank you so much both of you. @uhoh I searched TLEs and I found informations that I want from Celestrack. There is a situation that confuses me. Normally, values like inclination or argument of perigee etc. are fixed, but the values I find from TLE data differ slightly from the values in other databases I researched. Can I trust TLE values? I don't want 100 % accuracy, of course there will be errors, but are the TLE values close to reality? $\endgroup$
    – Sun
    Jan 2, 2021 at 8:25
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    $\begingroup$ @Sun actually a satellites orbit is constantly evolving. Due to Earth's lumpy gravity field and the gravity of the Sun and Moon it precesses, it's eccentricity can oscillates, the inclination drifts, and (primarily in LEO) because of atmospheric drag the semimajor axis is always decreasing. $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Jan 2, 2021 at 13:41
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    $\begingroup$ @uhoh Thank you so much. $\endgroup$
    – Sun
    Jan 2, 2021 at 14:10

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The Heavens-Above site can supply you with needed information.
heavens-above.com -> Satellite database -> Select satellite whatever you want -> Orbit. Voila.

And one more resource is Stuff in space, althouhg it shows only an inclination (from the needed parameters).

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