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Wikipedia's /Lucy (spacecraft) says nothing of propulsion, and it's SWRI home page for the spacecraft http://lucy.swri.edu/mission/Spacecraft.html gives specification and enumerates what's on Lucy’s instrument pointing platform (IPP) , but is silent on things like propulsion, attitude control, navigation, etc. Here are the specifications:

LUCY SPECIFICATIONS

Width:                      46.75 ft (14.25 m)
Height:                     23.6 ft (7.2 m) or 12.4 (3.8m) when solar panels are stored)
Depth:                      9.12 ft (2.78 m)
Diameter of Solar Panels:   23.9 ft (7.3 m)
Dry Mass (unfueled):        1810 lbs (821 kg)
Wet Mass (fueled):          3417 lbs (1550 kg)
Power:                      504 watts at the furthest encounter

Fuel is 47% of the mass, so this is a "flying fuel tank"-class spacecraft, with a larger fuel fraction than the electrically propulsed DAWN but well below the 60 to 70% of the winners.

This answer to What propulsion will Lucy use for its deep space maneuvers? cites only an article about a different mission that mentions conventional propulsion for Lucy in passing, then speculates further.

Question:

  1. Where can I read about Lucy's complete propulsion system?
  2. If the answer is "you can't" then please answer instead "Why not, I paid for it!? (a little at least)"

Refining Lucy Mission Delta-V During Spacecraft Design Using Trajectory Optimization Within High Fidelity Monte Carlo Maneuver Analysis (Preprint) AAS 19-614

update: I found the words "bipropellant main engine" in Refining Lucy Mission Delta-V During Spacecraft Design Using Trajectory Optimization Within High Fidelity Monte Carlo Maneuver Analysis (Preprint) AAS 19-614 J. V. McAdams et al. (2019??) along with some uncertainties in delta-v that might offer some clues.


Several major Deep Space Maneuvers (DSMs) shown in Lucy: Navigating a Jupiter Trojan Tour, AAS 17-632 D. Stanbridge et al.

Several major Deep Space Maneuvers (DSMs) shown in "Lucy: Navigating a Jupiter Trojan Tour", AAS 17-632

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  • $\begingroup$ More about Lucy: How will Lucy “make use” of a deep space atomic clock? $\endgroup$ – uhoh Feb 5 at 4:01
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, AAS19 was a conference in (August) 2019. It was the AIAA/AAS Astrodynamics Specialist Conference, held in Portland, Maine. $\endgroup$ – ChrisR Feb 5 at 5:48
  • $\begingroup$ @ChrisR Thanks! are the proceedings published? In a place where I can read them? $\endgroup$ – uhoh Feb 5 at 5:50
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    $\begingroup$ yes! The 2019 conference proceedings with titles and abstracts are available here: space-flight.org/docs/2019_summer/2019_summer.html. All of the AAS/AIAA conference proceedings are here: space-flight.org/conferences.html. However, you might need to purchase copies of the papers themselves, albeit lots of authors republish their papers on their websites. Therefore, searching the paper number usually leads to good results. $\endgroup$ – ChrisR Feb 5 at 18:21
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    $\begingroup$ @ChrisR I'm off to the library today then, thanks! $\endgroup$ – uhoh Feb 6 at 2:20

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