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I have seen the figures for 1U, 3U and 12U Satellites such as those provided here, but I have been unable to find pricing for the launch of a single 0.5U or 0.25U satellite.

I have seen many academic and industry satellites of this size, and I was wondering how they get into orbit. Do they need to be transported and deployed from a 3U like Swarm Technologies does?

Specifically, if I wanted to send only my 0.25U Satellite to Space without coordinating with 11 other 1/4U's to fill a 3U, is there even a provider that would do this?

Assume for the question of pricing, I want to get to LEO.

Thank you!

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  • $\begingroup$ SpaceBEEs are 1/4 U satellites and have been launched seven times There might be some information from those. See also How does the SpaceBEEs' experimental passive radar reflector work? for details and Are the SpaceBEEs still “illegal” or did they eventually receive approval to operate? $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Apr 21, 2021 at 1:29
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    $\begingroup$ Some smallsats are deployed from the ISS. If you only have 1 0.25U satellite, perhaps that would be a better option? In that ase I assume the price would be some tens of thousands of dollars (cargo space + astronauts deploying your satellite). Otherwise, I would imagine you will have to come up with a way to fit into a standardized launcher. $\endgroup$
    – Mu3
    Apr 21, 2021 at 11:23
  • $\begingroup$ @uhoh, I mentioned Swarm Technologies in my post. They are the company that made the Space Bee 0.25 U's. The pack 12 into a 3U to reduce costs since they launch at volume. I was specifically asking for the price for a single 0.25U CubeSat $\endgroup$
    – codeosaur
    Apr 22, 2021 at 3:23
  • $\begingroup$ @codeosaur yep, my comment is for the benefit of any potential future reader who would like to read further about sub-1U cubesats, and doing so also add those to the "linked" section at the right i.sstatic.net/z47r7.png $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Apr 22, 2021 at 3:27

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