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Would geothermal type cooling be possible for a stationary base on the surface of Venus?

Would the subsoil temperature of Venus hotter or cooler than the atmospheric temperature? (464C / 867F average atmospheric temperature per NASA)

The surface of Venus has many issues to overcome, including the hot, dense atmosphere. The scope of this question is limited to understanding how heat exchange to provide cooling could work on Venus.

I saw this question about using geothermal on the moon for heat that looks impractical to construct because of the depth required.

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    $\begingroup$ I don't think so, the temperature rises as one descends from the surface on Venus: space.stackexchange.com/questions/51764/… $\endgroup$ May 19 at 19:45
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    $\begingroup$ If it were somehow possible, you'd be better off directly using whatever mechanism was somehow removing heat from the surface faster than it can be heated from the hot atmosphere above and the hot mantle below. $\endgroup$ May 19 at 21:01
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    $\begingroup$ This is an interesting question! There is an infrared "window" in Venus' atmosphere that could allow some radiative cooling to space, it's possible that an emissivity-engineered material that had high emissivity (was "black") in this window and low emissivity (was "white") in other wavelengths where the atmosphere would radiate on to it would be able to provide a modest cooling mechanism. $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    May 19 at 21:01
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    $\begingroup$ For Venus' atmospheric window see question, answer, and comments at Has Hubble photographed Venus in near IR? If so how does it compare to the new and exciting Parker Solar Probe image? for engineered emissivity, see If used on an object on the moon, how cold would an ultrawhite painted object get? $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    May 19 at 21:01
  • $\begingroup$ @uhoh: Those are fascinating answers about heat on Venus! Reflecting UV will reduce heating from internal sources, but all spacecraft have to bleed off some internal heat to maintain operating range temperature for contents (electronics and/or passengers). It's difficult to do that if everything, sky and ground, are hot as a pizza oven. Thanks for the suggested answers, I learned something new. $\endgroup$ May 20 at 4:49

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