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Is it possible for us to somehow get the dataset related to radiation of Van Allen Belt, so as to work upon it and analyze it using AI model. I'm looking for numerical data regarding level of radiation in the Van Allen belt or any other thing to work on it to find different parameters. What could be some sources?

Thanks in advance for any help.

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    $\begingroup$ Get "the dataset"? Analyze it how and for what purpose? Please clarify what you are actually looking for. $\endgroup$
    – Jon Custer
    Sep 2 at 15:11
  • $\begingroup$ Actually I'm looking for numerical data regarding level of radiation in the Van Allen belt or any other thing to work on it to find different parameters. The data in form of csv or excel file. $\endgroup$
    – sam2611
    Sep 2 at 15:15
  • $\begingroup$ agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1029/2018JA026259 might prove a good starting point. $\endgroup$
    – Jon Custer
    Sep 2 at 15:18
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    $\begingroup$ @sam2611 this is an interesting question! The Van Allen belts are hard to observe directly, I'm no planetary scientist but I don't think there are regular monitors of it from the ground. Instead I think it's probably going to be necessary to look for spacecraft data; something that was designed to actually pass through one belt or the other (or both) many times and make direct measurements. I recommend you ask a second question as well, something like "How are the properties of the Van Allen radiation belts measured or monitored?" In it, you can include a link to this question. $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Sep 2 at 21:18
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    $\begingroup$ @uhoh Thankyou so much for your response. I will surely ask this question that you mentioned above. Also thankyou for this site Horizons I was completely unaware of this. $\endgroup$
    – sam2611
    Sep 3 at 3:31
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If you read the article @JonCuster linked, Multiyear Measurements of Radiation Belt Electrons: Acceleration, Transport, and Loss by Baker, et al., and scroll down to the end, you will find this:

Van Allen Probes REPT data used in this paper are available from the ECT Science Operations and Data Center (http://www.rbsp-ect.lanl.gov). Van Allen Probes Solar wind data and geomagnetic indices are provided by OMNIWeb (http://omniweb.gsfc.nasa.gov/).

This first of those leads through https://www.rbsp-ect.lanl.gov/science/DataDirectories.php to a long list of files in CDF format. Search results that say CDF means "content definition file" or "computable document format" are not relevant here, since these are Common Data Format, as often with NASA data. Download some of those files, learn to use a CDF-aware tool (what are you doing your data science in? it should know.) to read first their explanatory headers and then the contents, and you should be good to go.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thankyou. I'll go through the information once again, and try to work on it. But still I'm looking for more such sources. $\endgroup$
    – sam2611
    Sep 3 at 3:59
  • $\begingroup$ How do I open the cdf files? $\endgroup$
    – sam2611
    Sep 6 at 11:41
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    $\begingroup$ @sam2611 what software are you using for your analysis? Lots of popular tools, such as Python, Matlab, and IDL, already have cdf reader functions built in. If you want to make your own (which I would advise against, without a good reason), go to the NASA Goddard site I linked and download the library bindings for C, C#, Fortran, Java, Perl, and more. $\endgroup$
    – Ryan C
    Sep 6 at 17:59
  • $\begingroup$ No no I don't want to make my own I'll use the tools that are already present in python. Thanks you now I got it. $\endgroup$
    – sam2611
    Sep 7 at 6:28

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