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The Aurora Borealis(Northern Lights), in the North, gets more publicity, than the (Southern Lights) Aurora Australis, Why is it so?

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    $\begingroup$ Not sure this a space exploration question, but the simple answer is that the mid- and southern- latitudes from which the aurora australis are visible consist almost entirely of the uninhabited Southern Ocean and Antarctica. $\endgroup$
    – antlersoft
    Sep 4, 2021 at 15:52
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    $\begingroup$ Did you try to name a few countries you could visit to watch each of them? Say, beyond 60° latitude. $\endgroup$
    – asdfex
    Sep 4, 2021 at 15:55
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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to space exploration, but IMHO this question is off topic here. Without some work it's likely to be poorly received anywhere on stack exchange - you've offered no proof that the subject is "less popular", or even what that means. $\endgroup$ Sep 4, 2021 at 17:55
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    $\begingroup$ This has nothing to do with space exploration, and instead seems to just indicate the OPs location in the northern hemisphere. In Australia the Aurora Australis gets all the publicity $\endgroup$
    – Rory Alsop
    Sep 4, 2021 at 19:59
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    $\begingroup$ @sam2611 I think your premise is correct and it's related to distribution of land mass. Even photographers aboard the ISS might take more pictures of northern vs southern lights because there's more land. Here's a happy exception however! ‘An aurora under the full moon, what could be better?’ Astronaut takes stunning pictures of the Southern Lights from the International Space Station $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Sep 15, 2021 at 22:31

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Less people that can possibly see it.

The Aurora Borealis is easily visible from highly populated countries in northern Europe, Canada, sometimes from northern states of the USA.
There are a LOT of people that can and do get to see it.

By comparison, the Aurora Australis presents an equally glorious spectacle to:
Some penguins in Antarctica, the few inhabitants of Terra del Fuego at the peak of south america, and the Falkland Islands.

That's not very many people!

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    $\begingroup$ You should include New Zealand, and the southern coast of Australia in your list as well :-) $\endgroup$
    – Rory Alsop
    Sep 4, 2021 at 20:00
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    $\begingroup$ @RoryAlsop only for extreme solar weather. Australia sees the Aurora about as often as South Carolina does. It can happen, but is ludicrously scarce. And when it does happen, it is also happening in the northern hemisphere, and the news media is full of northern sightings. Heck, some americans barely believe that Australia exists! $\endgroup$ Sep 4, 2021 at 20:12
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    $\begingroup$ It was always lovely being able to see the aurora from the Falklands. Same latitude South as London is North, but much clearer atmosphere. $\endgroup$
    – Rory Alsop
    Sep 4, 2021 at 21:19

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