1
$\begingroup$

For RF we have the frequency allocation table, where the RF spectrum is regulated. Optical has big bandwidth, there is a lot of frequency space.

How do we regulate optical spectrum? I didnt find any regulation as for RF

it can happen two systems will use the same frequency and it is not good

$\endgroup$
5
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Did you look at ITU-R "visible light"? $\endgroup$
    – Ng Ph
    Sep 23, 2021 at 17:20
  • $\begingroup$ @NgPh It didnt pass. I am looking smth like for RF: this freq we use for TV broadcasting, the next is for military... smth like this. ITU-R is only for visible part of the optical specturm. $\endgroup$ Sep 24, 2021 at 6:46
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ The reason why we have established (by ITU) allocations of RF frequencies to specific applications is to protect the respective users from excessive inter-apps interference, like dividing a highway into lanes: slow, fast, forbidden to specific categories. Such management is necessary ONLY when the resource is limited for the number of users AND the risk of interferences is significant. Note that this risk is proportional to distance and the related beamwidth. None of these seems to be of concern (yet) for long-distance use of optical spectrum (or you have a specific case of concern?). $\endgroup$
    – Ng Ph
    Sep 24, 2021 at 9:16
  • $\begingroup$ @NgPh currently there are a lot of project to design a laser terminal for space. Laser terminall works in optic spectrum. ok, optical spectrum is Thz - frequencies, big bandwigth... but it still has to be regulated, right? With increased amount of the projects, we can get inter-apps interference. $\endgroup$ Sep 24, 2021 at 9:26
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ "Regulation" can mean many things: safety, interference, environmental, ... The ITU will start a study in view of future regulations only if there is a consensus on the benefit of establishing rules. If you can't find it in the WRC's (World Radio Conference) agenda, it means that the problem is not real (if you do, then this is the answer to your question). The next WRC is in 2023. $\endgroup$
    – Ng Ph
    Sep 24, 2021 at 12:47

1 Answer 1

3
$\begingroup$

Laser communication is not regulated by the International Telecommunication Union or Federal Communications Commission and it can be used without restrictions and does not require costly licenses. The reason for this is that its inherent small beam size avoids interference with other systems and renders any restrictive regulation in the future highly unlikely.

  1. No License Required for Operation
  2. Free Space Optics for Next-Generation Satellite Networks : table 1
  3. An overview of optical communications for small satellites and CubeSats on the global marketplace
$\endgroup$
0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.