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I have theoretical questions about inter-stellar travel at very high speeds (e.g. 0.9c). The inter-stellar medium is not a perfect vacuum, there are about 1 atom per cm3. This causes some friction. I tried to estimate this and it ended with about 30kW/m2.

Can this be correct, could it be more or less than this? Also, could it be possible to use rudders similar to planes at these speeds? What would the surface temperature be like?

Thanks for answers

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    $\begingroup$ Lots of your question is answered here space.stackexchange.com/questions/53929/… , but that question discusses movement at 0.1c. Bear in mind that at 0.9 imparts 256.9 times the energy per mass of particle than 0.1c does, and with time dilation the apparent energy flux will be 256.9(energy)*2.3(time dilation)*9(distance per time) = 5317.83 times as much $\endgroup$ Jan 9 at 11:28
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    $\begingroup$ I think you slipped one digit on the energy per surface, I get it as 3.7kW/m^2 . But the greatest part of that hits you as 380MeV protons, which is nasty radiation. $\endgroup$ Jan 9 at 11:35
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The specifics of the total power aside, the interstellar medium will be penetrating radiation from the perspective of the craft. You won't be able to easily redirect it with airfoil-like surfaces. Drag devices for attitude control might make sense, but would only be useful after acceleration, and would have to be thick enough to brake and absorb the particles, and would be subject to damage. Magnetic sails might work better.

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