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ISRO Launch Vehicle Mark 3 (LVM3) is a three stage launch vehicle:

  1. First stage – S200 Boosters
  2. Second stage – L110
  3. Third stage – C25

Where do each of these stages end up after a launch?

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    $\begingroup$ For the regular geostationary transfer orbit missions, or the recent low earth high inclination orbit mission? Exact regions will vary with the trajectory / intended orbit. $\endgroup$
    – AJN
    Nov 2, 2022 at 15:18
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    $\begingroup$ Does the accepted answer to this answer your question? space.stackexchange.com/questions/58770/… $\endgroup$ Nov 2, 2022 at 20:25

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Here is the map I prepared from NOTAM issued to define drop zones for spent stages of GSLV Mk. III (now known as LVM3) D1 mission that launched GSAT-19 satellite into GTO orbit.

Google map showing hazard zones started at Chennai and extending southeastward, two in the Bay of Bengal for S200 and payload fairing splashdown, and L110 splashdown in the Andaman Sea https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1MLABQ4anKZne9n-SWGkWuMfyOfM

And here are the flight events.

GSLV Mk. III D1 / GSAT-19 flight events

The hazard zones from Zone 1 to 4 are for range clearance, S200 splashdown, Payload fairing or 'heatshield' splashdown and L110 core stage splashdown.

The upper-stage C25 goes into orbit along payload and is not de-orbited post-mission and merely passivized.

For recent LVM3-M2 launch with OneWeb's batch 14 satellites, it was a southward flight path. You can see the resulting dogleg in following map and S200 drop zone is merged with payload fairing drop zone (DZ2)

Google Map showing dogleg around Sri Lanka and hazard zones extending south into the Indian Ocean https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1bVzNQKyczkHgYHN9XSZBXwugoY4BmC0

LVM3-M2 / OneWeb 14 flight events

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    $\begingroup$ open request to anyone with edit privileges: my phone isn't displaying the maps properly, but I think screenshots of the maps should be put into the post itself. If no one else does I will later. +1 already though $\endgroup$
    – Erin Anne
    Nov 3, 2022 at 19:16
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    $\begingroup$ Here's a NASASpaceflight article that also says the C25 is psasivated and remains in orbit; just a secondary source, but a good one. $\endgroup$
    – Erin Anne
    Nov 3, 2022 at 20:35
  • $\begingroup$ @ErinAnne Thanks. The C25 stage has not been qualified to be restartable even if the CE20 engine on it by design can be configured to be reignitable. The upcoming C32 stage will be restartable and hopefully they would deorbit those post-mission. $\endgroup$
    – Ohsin
    Nov 4, 2022 at 13:06
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That depends on where exactly you're going with it. Let me explain.

If the rocket is only going to LEO, the boosters end up being expended, namely by just dropping them into the sea and then they break apart on impact. The core stage flies further up and then once it runs out of fuel, it separates from the Launch Vehicle and burns up on re-entry. After that, the second core stage fires and gets to LEO, then is safely deorbited. If you are going to GTO, pretty much the same thing happens except the core stage flies further.

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    $\begingroup$ do you have references that the boosters get dropped onto the ground? It's considered fairly unusual that China drops stages onto land instead of the sea, and I can't find any evidence that India does the same. $\endgroup$
    – Erin Anne
    Nov 2, 2022 at 19:08
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    $\begingroup$ Do you have a reference for the second core stage being abandoned in orbit? This would be highly unusual. For about a decade or two, it has been frowned upon to just abandon stuff in orbit. In fact, the reason why the Long March 5B is all over the news right now is precisely because this is highly unusual and highly frowned upon. Normally, upper stages are either intentionally deorbited with a deorbit burn to hit a specific, designated patch of ocean such as the South Pacific Oceanic Uninhabited Area (aka "rocket cemetery") or for high energy missions moved to a graveyard orbit. $\endgroup$ Nov 3, 2022 at 6:56
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    $\begingroup$ When a Falcon 9 upper stage malfunctioned and couldn't safely deorbited, again, that was big news. $\endgroup$ Nov 3, 2022 at 6:57
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    $\begingroup$ Useful in answering this sort of question are notice to airman (NOTAM) that close airspace where parts are expected to come down. Have been unable to locate the original for this launch, but this video claims to include a map at 116 seconds youtu.be/k6A2gYHf7Z4?t=116 where the northern area would have been first stage impact and the larger southerly one would be the second stage. $\endgroup$ Nov 3, 2022 at 11:14
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    $\begingroup$ @GremlinWranger I have added an answer with properly mapped hazard zones and correlation with flight events.. $\endgroup$
    – Ohsin
    Nov 3, 2022 at 16:18

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