1
$\begingroup$

I'm not so sure on the specs. So, I'll just look up my handy spacey rocket class chart, oh, I don't have one. The system should class rockets into these classes: light, medium, and heavy. The real question here is does a rocket class rating system even exist, if so, how does it work?

$\endgroup$
7
  • $\begingroup$ What's a 'rocket class rating system' supposed to be? Rockets have mass and filling according to their target-$\Delta v$'s, suborbital, LEO, GEO, interplanetary ... $\endgroup$ Commented Nov 14, 2022 at 19:28
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ Oh wait, if you did a bit of research you would have found one. en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Launch_vehicle#Mass_to_orbit $\endgroup$
    – Topcode
    Commented Nov 14, 2022 at 19:36
  • $\begingroup$ @Topcode why thank you. that is actually helpful. But I usually tend to stay away from Wikipedia. $\endgroup$
    – user49796
    Commented Nov 14, 2022 at 19:47
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ @percythemarsrover if the original source is better, here it is nasa.gov/pdf/… $\endgroup$
    – Topcode
    Commented Nov 14, 2022 at 19:52
  • $\begingroup$ @Topcode ah, there's lot of detail. thanks. $\endgroup$
    – user49796
    Commented Nov 14, 2022 at 20:10

1 Answer 1

1
$\begingroup$

The system should class rockets into these classes: light, medium, and heavy.

Most organizations use the following:

  • Light rockets can only put less than 2000 kg of payload into low Earth orbit.
  • Medium rockets can put 2000 kg to 20000 kg of payload into low Earth orbit.
  • Heavy rockets can put over 20000 kg of payload into low Earth orbit.

Some split heavy rockets into two classes, heavy and super heavy. Heavy lift vehicles can put over 20000 kg of payload into low Earth orbit, but no more than 50000 kg of payload into low Earth orbit. Super heavy lift vehicles can put over 50000 kg of payload into low Earth orbit.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.