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Is there an estimate of the mass Artemis Landers must be able to deliver to the Lunar surface? I am interested in the total mass - vehicle and payload on arrival - as well as a breakdown of how much mass is delivered for on moon use and how much is required to support launch back to space?

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    $\begingroup$ I know of no way to answer the part of the question about the mass of the vehicle - I doubt anyone knows that at this point - but you can read the requirements for landed and returned cargo mass here. sam.gov/api/prod/opps/v3/opportunities/resources/files/… Extract the zip file and look at document HLS-RQMT-001. Table 8 and 9. Spoiler alert: 865 kg of cargo to the surface, 525 returned from the surface. (Cargo includes the self-loading cargo) $\endgroup$ Dec 12, 2022 at 23:15

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This depends heavily on the lander.

For example, Peregrine Mission One with the Peregrine lander from Astrobotics will carry 28 payloads with a total mass of up to 256 kg. The lander itself has a mass of 1283 kg. Peregrine has no upmass capability, it is a pure, expendable, lander.

IM-3 with the Nova-C lander by Intuitive Machines will land 92 kg.

The VIPER rover will be landed by a Griffin lander, also by Astrobotics. Griffin's mass is 450 kg, VIPER's is 430 kg.

For the CLPS program alone, NASA has awarded contracts to 5 companies with 6 different landers. Each lander has different mass and different payload capabilities. It is impossible to give a general answer.

As far as I can see, none of the CLPS landers has any way of taking off again, so at least this part of your question can be answered in general:

how much is required to support launch back to space?

Nothing. None of the CLPS landers have this capability, but NASA selected them anyway, so clearly, this is not a requirement for CLPS.

This is different for other programs, of course. HLS, which is also part of Artemis, requires upmass capabilities, for obvious reasons: you don't want your astronauts stuck on the Moon forever.

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    $\begingroup$ FYI you seem to have some broken formatting in the second paragraph (the %thinsp;) $\endgroup$ Dec 13, 2022 at 1:48

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