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I have a master's degree in aerospace engineering and I'm preparing for job interviews for orbital mechanics/space flight dynamics engineer positions and I need material about maths, physics, 3D geometry, something not too general but that is preparatory for orbital mechanics. I'm looking for something different from my academic material (that, for the mentioned subjects, is in Italian language), so I've posed this question with the hope to know new sources that can give me a more practical approach. Can you suggest me pdf notes or books?

Info about jobs I'm applying for: entry level positions for European consulting companies that work for space agencies or other space companies.

EDIT: For physics I found Physics for Scientists and Engineers 6th Edition by Tipler, Paul A., Mosca, Gene

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    $\begingroup$ Just curious; will the successful candidate join an existing team of experienced orbital mechanics and space flight dynamics engineers, or is it the candidate's responsibility to be the first one; able to plan a low-energy transfer from a Earth-Moon near rectilinear halo orbit associated with L1 to a planar Lyapunov orbit associated with L2 using minimum delta-v and maximizing the exploitation the Sun's perturbative effects? Applicants for those two positions might benefit from very different reading lists. $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    May 7, 2023 at 1:19
  • $\begingroup$ See for example the papers cited in What is a near rectilinear halo orbit? and in its answer(s) and this answer to What sort of orbital elements are used to describe halo orbits? and definitely make sure you can solve How far would the Mars L1 Lagrangian Point be from Mars? with a pencil and paper. By the way you didn't mention if the company is focused primarily on launch and low Earth orbit and associated maneuvers, or n-body deep space stuff. $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    May 7, 2023 at 1:25
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    $\begingroup$ I can't help on the particular Math and Physics texts that you will find most helpful, but you should read "Space Mission Engineering: The New SMAD. James R. Wertz (Editor)" cover-to-cover and find a way to mention the text in your interview and find a helpful, very introductory source on manifolds and chaos. Please review the meta question Resources and references on the topic of space exploration and all of its excellent answers! $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    May 7, 2023 at 1:28
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    $\begingroup$ It would be helpful to tell us what is your education now and what is your current knowledge level in math, physics, engeneering and computer science. $\endgroup$
    – Heopps
    May 10, 2023 at 10:32
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    $\begingroup$ Question updated! $\endgroup$
    – g_don
    May 10, 2023 at 11:10

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There was a recent Hacker News on this: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=35762483

IMHO if you're only going to get to one of them, Bate, Mueller & White "Fundamentals of Astrodynamics" is affordable and covers all the right things for an intro.

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Bate & Mueller, as much I know, has not been converted in metric units. I've bought a copy and was disappointed. I suggest "Orbital mechanics for engineering students" by Curtis.

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    $\begingroup$ I presume you already know "Fondamenti di meccanica del volo spaziale" by Mengali & Quarta (Università di Pisa). $\endgroup$
    – user51034
    May 13, 2023 at 6:40

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