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Is there a freely available and widely used, standard database on liquid rocket propellants with detailed information on the most important properties that is commonly used by NASA/associated aerospace companies?

I found lots of references to "Liquid Propellants & Fuels Database (LPFD) of JANNAF Interagency Propulsion Committee". But I can't find any way to log in (I believe access is restricted to US citizens, I'm German...)

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    $\begingroup$ Please have a look at our meta: meta.space.stackexchange.com/questions/249/… , especially Modern Engineering for Design of Liquid-Propellant Rocket Engines. Dieter K. Huzel and David H. Huang. AIAA, 1992. Also space.stackexchange.com/questions/1188/… which cites Wikipedia. $\endgroup$ – Deer Hunter Apr 14 '15 at 20:31
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    $\begingroup$ Please also let us know how precise you want this source to be. If utmost precision is needed, one should contact the vendor or conduct a fire test. $\endgroup$ – Deer Hunter Apr 14 '15 at 20:36
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    $\begingroup$ I have the second edition of Huzel and Huang. There are tables with selected properties of propellants but non of them are referenced in any way. Certainly Mr Huzel and Huang didn't lock themselves into a lab and tested the properties on their own. Same with Sutton and Biblarz. No one seems to care for referencing where they have their data from?! $\endgroup$ – cl10k Apr 15 '15 at 9:47
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Since the fuel performance depends heavily on the oxidizer, engine, open/closed cycle, temperature, pressure, shape of the nozzle and many other things, just list of fuels is us not always enough, you need more like a set of formulas for each propellant.

The best calculator I saw in public is the Rocket Propulsion Analysis App (Windows / Mac / Linux). There is a properties.inp propellant database inside the app directory which is just a text spreadsheet that you can use.

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  • $\begingroup$ I'm actualy just looking for chemical/physical properties like density, vapor pressure (both as a function of the temperature), freezing point etc... $\endgroup$ – cl10k Apr 16 '16 at 16:16

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