Linked Questions

16 votes
4 answers
3k views

What are the conditions for re-entry of an object in a (highly) elliptical orbit?

There's something I don't understand: When it comes to de-commissioned satellites, rocket bodies etc. I thought one way of re-entry was via a highly elliptical orbit: The perigee gets low enough (app....
eerie's user avatar
  • 439
12 votes
2 answers
1k views

Why is FAI considering lowering the Karman Line to 80km?

I ran across this FAI statement The Karman line is the 100km altitude used by FAI and many other organisations to mark the “boundary” of space . In the last few years there have been many scientific ...
Machavity's user avatar
  • 7,840
4 votes
3 answers
1k views

When do aircraft become solarcraft?

Any body travelling through particles undergoes drag. Any body able to generate lift (for instance spheres cannot generate lift) can generate lift if it undergoes drag. First by assuming one body in ...
user721108's user avatar
  • 4,248
9 votes
1 answer
917 views

Did the Soviet Union put an unmanned satellite in "very low orbit"above the Kármán line which used aerodynamic attitude control?

This interesting, archived page https://www.webcitation.org/618QHms8h?url=http://www.fai.org/astronautics/100km.asp which I found in this answer, says: Later in the same decade (or very early in ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
2 votes
3 answers
441 views

Is there any kind of research on *sub*-orbital rendezvous-ing with a space tug outside the atmosphere?

The key difference with a plain old-fashioned orbital rendezvous would seem to be that there'd be limited time to only briefly match velocities and trajectories: Let's say a vehicle launched from ...
Prototypist's user avatar
11 votes
1 answer
581 views

Did the crew of Soyuz MS-10 pass the Karman Line?

Just wondering if Nick Hague got his gold astronaut wings.
Organic Marble's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
308 views

Do owners of reentering spacecraft notify the countries' whose airspace they are likely to violate and seek permission?

@PearsonArtPhoto's answer contemplates: Any object that is below 100 km now is considered an aircraft, and technically needs the permission of the country over which it is flying to enter that air ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
1 vote
2 answers
295 views

Does Jonathan McDowell access U.S. military tracking network data? If so, how? Is a security clearance involved? (Can I too?)

NPR's news item and audio podcast New Chinese Space Plane Landed At Mysterious Air Base, Evidence Suggests draws heavily from information and quotes from noted astronomer with the Harvard-Smithsonian ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
3 votes
1 answer
308 views

When is/will be the symposium to revisit the Karman line and consider the "McDowell line"?

In the January 16, 2019 Sixty Symbols video Where is the edge of space? Dr Meghan Gray from the University of Nottingham discusses Jonathan McDowell's paper The edge of space: Revisiting the Karman ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
5 votes
2 answers
213 views

Using lasers to reach the Karman line

I've just seen this Anton Petrov video: New Type of Laser Levitation Could Help Us Explore the Mesosphere. It's about this new form of levitation that uses lasers to heat up the air underneath a craft,...
R. Hall's user avatar
  • 812
-6 votes
2 answers
445 views

What's the *calculation* for the altitude near the Kármán line where the lifting force equals the centrifugal force? [duplicate]

Edit: This question is not a duplicate of the associated question and has no answers to it that were posted for that associated question. This question asks specifically for a calculation, the ...
Cornelis's user avatar
  • 7,503
5 votes
1 answer
202 views

Is there a standard 'low orbit' for other solar system bodies?

Is there a standard or convention for what 'counts' as a low orbit for other solar system bodies? I'm currently writing code for computing arbitrary Hohmann/ patched conics transfers, and I am looking ...
Ingolifs's user avatar
  • 6,428
5 votes
1 answer
278 views

Are satellites whose orbits go below 100 km perigee considered having multiple spaceflights?

The International Aviation Federation (FAI) considers the space border at 100 km (330,000 ft) above sea level. So if an orbiting body goes below that altitude and continues its orbit without ...
Giovanni's user avatar