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Questions tagged [altitude]

Questions regarding the distance of an object above a surface.

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How can I calculate the altitude my waterrocket will fly with a certain amount of pressure?

I am trying to calculate how high my waterrocket will fly before launching it at different pressure using the Tsiolkovsky rocket equation. However, I stumbled upon an issue since the altitude that it ...
The Rocket fan's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
93 views

Azimuth and Altitude of a Meteor Shower

What is a reliable source to understand the Azimuth and Altitude of a meteor shower at a specific geographic location at an instant of time for observation?
Smarty's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
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How do you find the propellant mass needed to reach an specified altitude? (altitude at end of burn plus altitude during coast)

This question is basically entirely explained in the title, but I'll explain it more so this question doesn't get shut down. Basically, does anyone have an equation to find the propellant mass(solid) ...
Anish Kommireddy's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
668 views

Is it wrong to say that the thrust increases with time?

Is it wrong to state that the thrust increases with time? Because it implies that it actually increases over increasing altitude, with time?
FalconHeavy321's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
347 views

Using 2023 technology, how low can a satellite orbit earth?

With the technology available today, 01-01-2023, what is the lowest altitude at which we can orbit a satellite around earth?
Niranjan's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
179 views

How high can New Shepard fly?

If all the cargo onboard New Shepard were removed and the booster was not recovered, how high could it fly?
The Rocket fan's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
129 views

How to find the altitude of a rocket?

I know this may be a very simple question, but is there any formula from which I can estimate the altitude of a liquid fuel (model) rocket based on the propellant, oxidizer, mass, density, etc? I've ...
Perseus_Lynx's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
83 views

Study of selection higher stages for a multistage rocket

Will it be correct to say that the thrust produced by the first stage is the ultimate limiting factor for a rocket's ability? The logic behind this thought is like this: Higher quantity of its ...
Niranjan's user avatar
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22 votes
1 answer
2k views

How does Ingenuity measure its altitude when flying?

The Ingenuity folks at NASA and lots of viewers on the internet I'm sure were pleased to see the first data from "the first flight of powered aircraft on another planet" (by humans at least);...
uhoh's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
283 views

Spacecraft altitude measurement

While in atmosphere, altitude is measured by using pressure gauges - higher the altitude, lower the pressure. How is the altitude measured once we cross the atmosphere?
Niranjan's user avatar
  • 3,796
1 vote
0 answers
62 views

CesiumJS: how to convert Alt/Az as seen from Earth surface in (x,y,z) position w.r.t Earth center?

I know how an antenna located on Earth surface is poiting to an object in space, by means of Altitude and Azimuth. I would like to show the pointed object in the 3d view, so, as far as I can ...
jumpjack's user avatar
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5 votes
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Are satellites whose orbits go below 100 km perigee considered having multiple spaceflights?

The International Aviation Federation (FAI) considers the space border at 100 km (330,000 ft) above sea level. So if an orbiting body goes below that altitude and continues its orbit without ...
Giovanni's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
1k views

Why does a satellite with a higher mass fall slower?

I was doing simulations in GMAT and I could observe that if I increase the mass of the satellite, the satellite falls slower ... and if I reduce the mass of the satellite, then it falls faster (I only ...
Ricardo Casimiro's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
278 views

Why isn't the Kármán line itself considered to be in outer space?

The Kármán line is the altitude at which the atmospheric pressure is so thin a craft would need to achieve orbital velocity in order to maintain enough aerodynamic lift and control. Therefore, ...
Giovanni's user avatar
  • 515
11 votes
3 answers
2k views

Did/does the US use statute or nautical miles to decide who gets astronaut wings?

As mentioned in a few questions and answers (1,2,3,4), US astronauts receive their astronaut wings upon crossing the 50 mile altitude mark. Are these statute miles (1609.344 m, 5280 ft) or nautical ...
costrom's user avatar
  • 1,053
13 votes
1 answer
2k views

At what minimum distance does the Earth appear star-like to the naked eye?

At what distance does the Earth become indistinguishable from stars and other planets to the naked eye, like the Pale Blue Dot or like Venus or Mars visible from Earth? Dot-like rather than spherical. ...
LoveForChrist's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
152 views

When did the FAI adopt the 100km line as border to space (for their purposes)?

Let me preface this with a disclaimer: This is not a discussion about which height makes sense. This is purely about international recognition by the FAI. Wikipedia says "An international committee ...
Polygnome's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
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Do astronauts set a pressure on the space craft altimeter before launch or zero it?

I was watching First Man (2018) and noticed that just before the launch of Armstrong's Gemini mission the capsule's altimeter read zero. My understanding of the Titan II GLV is that it's 109ft tall ...
Remotec's user avatar
  • 143
1 vote
0 answers
123 views

Differences between Semi Major Axes and ECF Magnitudes for Circular Orbits with J2 Perturbation

I have simulated (in STK) a satellite at near circular orbit, near-equator, with Brouwer Lyddane Mean Long SMA of 6935.31km, inclination 10 degrees, and eccentricity of 0.0001875 (these are solved-for ...
Samuel Low's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
131 views

How to determine altitude when altimeters fail?

Specifically for high altitude amateur rocketry, how is altitude determined when you get too high(too low pressure) for barometric altimeters to work? I heard about GPS, however, COCOM limitations ...
Lucas Thelen's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
46 views

What is the Cheapest way to track my balloon (only altitude or gps coordinates)? [closed]

I want to build extreme cheap high altitude stuff - balloon, paper plane :) anything. Its cold outside now, and i dont want to track, and collect the my landed "spacecraft". So, i need a very cheap ...
Norbert's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
136 views

How would propagation differ between a GEO and a Retrograde GEO?

A Binary Equatorial Synchronous Retrograde Orbit is an orbit that would travel in the opposite direction of GEO and would pass over the same point on Earth twice per day at the same altitude of GEO. ...
Muze's user avatar
  • 1
7 votes
1 answer
534 views

What are the causes of these episodes of faster than average altitude loss by the ISS?

@Cristiano's question No reboosts for the ISS shows the plot below. I don't have the original source. I've added some annotations including four arrows to indicate what looks like short periods (a day ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
3 votes
0 answers
97 views

How are Hayabusa2's target markers deployed?

This presentation talks about 'target markers' which are five soft, reflective balls that are released onto the asteroid's surface prior to landing. They allow the probe to more precisely locate the ...
Jack's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
2k views

Is it possible to calculate Max-Q without having to input an altitude

Is it possible to calculate max-q based on just upwards velocity instead of specially inputting a given altitude/air density? Based on this graph of Falcon 9 launches till MECO below "Air Pressure vs. ...
UndefinedUsername's user avatar
9 votes
2 answers
2k views

What is the deepest place on Mars? Do humans need pressurized suits there?

Is there any particular deep area, trench, fissure, lava tube or otherwise on of Mars in which a person could survive with only an oxygen supply? How deep would plants or animals have to be in Mars ...
Muze's user avatar
  • 1
2 votes
1 answer
831 views

different ways to calculate satellite height

I found 2 formulas for calculating height. First is: height = magnitude(satillate_position_vector) - Earth_radius Second is: ...
Raccoon's user avatar
  • 135
4 votes
1 answer
997 views

Why are orbital periods different for different GNSS positioning system constellations?

My question is restricted to global positioning systems (Regional ones have geosynchronous constraints, which limits drastically the orbit choice) The diagram in this question highlights different ...
Manu H's user avatar
  • 3,790
5 votes
1 answer
167 views

How is stability of Geosynchronous Orbits (GSO) affected by Earth’s mass?

I'm researching stable orbits slightly beyond GSO and I need to find out how close to GSO I could place an object without risking collision. If the Earth was homogeneous the altitude should be the ...
Jez Turner's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
173 views

Is it possible for an asteroid to be captured by earth in such a way that it has minimal relative velocity?

Is it possible for a metal (or dirt/ice) asteroid of 1km average diameter to enter the Earth-Moon system in such a way that the asteroid behaves as if it were dropped from a height instead of as a ...
Eric Hauenstein's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
2k views

Satellite altitude as a function of time?

In order to obtain a more accurate radiation estimate in this question, I am trying to approximate and/or determine the altitude of a satellite as a function of time. The satellite has an apogee of ...
a.t.'s user avatar
  • 559
8 votes
1 answer
464 views

Why is the LEO/MEO boundary at 2,000 km?

Differentiating Medium Earth Orbits from High Earth Orbits at the geosynchronous altitude makes intuitive sense. Is there some meaningful difference between orbits above vs. below 2,000 km, or is the ...
Ghillie Dhu's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
947 views

What is the Fischer 1960 Mercury Ellipsoid, and why is it called that?

Don't be distracted by the 1960 Mercury shown below. Reading about Irene Fischer (also here, and mentioned in this answer) and seeing the Fischer 1960 Mercury Ellipsoid turn up in tables of ellipsoid ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
29 votes
4 answers
13k views

How is the altitude of a satellite defined, given that the Earth is not spherical?

The altitude of a satellite is the distance between the Earth's surface and the satellite, but the Earth itself is not spherical. At the equator the Earth's radius is 21 km more than at the poles, and ...
Sumit Agrawal's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
187 views

Satellite altitude variances in orbit

I understand that all satellites must have burn corrections to keep their orbits where they are needed. However my question is specifically about what those changes are in magnitude from the desired ...
CRD567's user avatar
  • 19
2 votes
2 answers
684 views

Determining altitude of a cubesat/nanosat

I've seen cubesat projects talk about the altitude of their satellite. Starting orbit is, presumably, known based on deployment conditions. But how does one track the altitude once it's been in ...
jgalak's user avatar
  • 766
4 votes
1 answer
684 views

Have there ever been significant changes in the altitude of the ISS?

Have there ever been significant changes in the altitude of the ISS? By significant, I mean changes greater than about 40 km, thus by far exceeding the periodic reboosts. If there haven't been, then ...
Zaibis's user avatar
  • 993
2 votes
1 answer
85 views

Altitude control of ISS via Progress-MS

What is the highest altitude the ISS can raise itself to? What about with help from Progress-MS? How much would it cost to raise the ISS by 1km with or without progress?
user avatar
15 votes
2 answers
2k views

What is the reason for the Ariane 5 launcher with Intelsat 29e losing altitude?

After reaching a peak altitude of 222 km the Ariane 5 launcher with Intelsat 29e starts to lose altitude. What is the reason for this trajectory? Youtube video Paper on Ariane 5
SE - stop firing the good guys's user avatar
9 votes
2 answers
3k views

What is the ISS maximum altitude?

I see two threats to the ISS as its altitude goes up: Cosmic/solar radiation, which would endanger the crew and the electronics aboard. Orbital debris, which would have higher relative speed and ...
Antzi's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
2k views

Is there an equivalent term for average altitude like semi-major axis?

So if we have a satellite in a non circular orbit, can't state a time independent altitude (we can only state the altitude at a given time). We can however state a constant value for the semi-major ...
ThePlanMan's user avatar
  • 4,431
3 votes
3 answers
7k views

Relationship between satellite's mass and orbital altitude

Is there a relation between the mass of a satellite and its orbital altitude? I mean, will a heavy satellite orbit at a higher or lower altitude than a lighter one, considering everything else being ...
Hakim's user avatar
  • 133
7 votes
1 answer
253 views

Why is Dawn in a much higher observation orbit than Rosetta?

Dawn orbits Ceres at thousands of kilometers periapsis altitude, and doesn't seem to plan to go lower than 375 km. In contrast, Rosetta has been down to about 30 km altitude, and will finally even try ...
LocalFluff's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
172 views

Has the U.S. looked at the option of having a space station outside of LEO? If so, why or why not?

I am just curious, in theory about what the potential impacts would be to science if we were to have a space station that was outside of Low Earth Orbit. Of course, it would take longer to get to and ...
Kleigh's user avatar
  • 474
7 votes
2 answers
1k views

What altitude would an ocean crossing sub-orbital flight need to reach?

So, let's save some travel time and throw a spaceship, rather than an airplane, across the Atlantic or Pacific ocean on a ballistic trajectory. How high would it have to go? How high do the doomsday ...
LocalFluff's user avatar
10 votes
2 answers
1k views

AOCS for very small satellites (micro, nano, pico, femto)

What does a typical Attitude and Orbit Control System (AOCS) look like for a very small satellite? How does such a satellite control its attitude and orbit? Are there any means of propulsion at this ...
user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
462 views

LEO insertion altitude

Does anyone know what would be the exact or approximate altitude for the stage separation and spacecraft separation of LEO insertion? Moreover, does anyone has a picture including all step of LEO ...
satellite_learner's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
773 views

Is an orbital launch more like a vertical climb or a Hohmann Transfer?

It is said that a launch to orbit requires a Delta V of 9.3–10 km/s, and this encompasses orbital speed, air drag, gravity drag, and the energy to raise altitude to low Earth orbit. But I'm troubled ...
AlanSE's user avatar
  • 16.4k
6 votes
1 answer
1k views

What altitudes did the first astronauts reach?

Including the suborbital flight of Alan Shepard, what altitudes did the first men in space reach? I am looking for a list of maybe the first 5-10 people who reached orbit, but also the first ...
Stu's user avatar
  • 5,948
3 votes
1 answer
199 views

Why did the LLTV have a service ceiling of 6,000 ft?

According to Wikipedia, the Lunar Landing Training Vehicle had a "service ceiling" of 6,000 ft (1,800 m). I assume this is the maximum altitude that it can perform at. What was the limiting factor?
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