Questions tagged [crewed-spaceflight]

Crewed spaceflight (also referred to as human spaceflight or manned spaceflight) is space travel with a crew aboard the spacecraft. When a spacecraft is crewed, it can be operated directly, as opposed to being remotely operated or autonomous.

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Why didn't Crew 8 launch to an elliptical orbit with an apogee closer to the altitude of the space station?

Crew 8 launched to a 191x215km orbit (ref), but the ISS is orbiting at 425km (ref). I'm curious as to the reason why they didn't launch into, for example, a 191x425km orbit initially.
phil1008's user avatar
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How much time does the ISS require in "non value adding activities"?

Generally, we can divide the things that a worker, in this case an astronaut, does, into two categories: Value adding: Activities which contribute directly towards the employer's goals. In a company, ...
Dragongeek's user avatar
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When would the Soviets have landed on the moon, if NASA had not beaten them to it? [closed]

I know that after the untimely death of Korolev, the crewed moon mission was having struggles, but could they have overcome them? What would their timeline have been? Side question/pure conjecture: ...
ijustlovemath's user avatar
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Would max-Q coincide with the loudest/roughest part of the flight?

Say you're an astronaut on a ride to the ISS, and you have with you a very accurate clock, an automatic pressure sensor, and a high quality microphone. If you synchronized the sensor and microphone ...
ijustlovemath's user avatar
1 vote
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Was there ever a crewed space mission that could possibly escape the solar system? [duplicate]

The German song "Major Tom" adds a twist onto David Bowie's "Space Oddity", by giving clues to the spacecraft commander Mayor Tom to deliberately abort the mission in favor of ...
dronus's user avatar
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11 votes
3 answers
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An alternative architecture for a mission to Mars

This image, which is supposed to represent the current architecture of the mission to Mars by NASA, raised a wave of emotions. People find it too long and complicated. But is it really possible to ...
Saturn V's user avatar
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5 votes
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What materials are used for human spacecraft pressure vessels and why?

I'm looking for what specific aluminum alloys are used for human-rated spacecraft pressure vessels (habitable module) and why. I've been able to find the material for Orion is Al-2219 but nothing for ...
Retsied's user avatar
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How to Analyze and Size Spacecraft Structures: Loads Development & Structural Dynamics

Hello, I'm a mechanical/aerospace design engineer trying to expand into structural analysis. What I'm looking for: A guide or summary as to 1) how spacecraft design loads are determined, and 2) how ...
Retsied's user avatar
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What are the prelaunch procedures that astronauts follow before the launch?

What procedures do the astronauts follow, like the suit-up procedures and communication checks that happen before the launch. And how will the astronaut's family meet the astronauts prior to the ...
Ranjith's user avatar
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13 votes
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What are the "insect antennae" on the MMU (Manned Maneuvering Unit)?

What are the “insect antennae” structures in front of the astronaut’s visor? They appear to be attached to the MMU, but do not appear in the MMU User Guide, static displays or Weightless Environment ...
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Have there been any Spacewalks to free-flying satellites?

Talks of a new Hubble servicing mission have made me curious: Has a spacewalk between a crewed craft and a free-flying satellite ever occurred? As far as I am aware, the Shuttle visited satellites and ...
Dragongeek's user avatar
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Shuttle-era mission profile for a desperation moon mission

It is 1996. For reasons best left to Worldbuilding SE, it has become a matter of civilizational life and death to send humans to the moon and bring them back to earth as soon as possible. Everybody is ...
Mark Foskey's user avatar
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2 answers
485 views

Are rockets deliberately throttled back towards the end of the burn to spare crew and airframe g-forces?

Throughout its burn, a rocket gets lighter as propellant is consumed. As a result, acceleration (and g-force) increase. In the shuttle, the SSMEs were throttled back towards the end of the burn ...
Woody's user avatar
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6 votes
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Looking for Apollo Flight Control Hardware Blueprints (such as RHC, THC and COAS)

I've been looking to build replicas of Apollo flight control hardware such as RHC, THC, ACA, TTCA and COAS, and am looking for detailed engineering drawings that show dimensions and internal ...
mini earth's user avatar
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1 answer
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Which countries could launch a human into space on very short notice

I’m not sure if it's better to ask this here or on worldbuilding.se Which countries except Russia/China/US can launch their own crew into space and return them unharmed (if for some reason this really ...
Tauri's user avatar
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What are the movable-plastic-bag-looking things on the nose of Shuttle?

I was watching the last launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-132) and noticed some objects that moved during the launch. I was curious about what these objects were and why they were positioned that ...
Lady Be Good's user avatar
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Live_ISS_Stream stopped?

so I've come across this video, 11 hours of ISS transmissions during 2021 ASAT incident by Russia. The description says the footage was archived from this IBM stream site, so I've looked to see if it ...
user52175's user avatar
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Semi-interdependant Jovian Colony [closed]

Given the low $\Delta v$ needed to transfer between the moons of Jupiter even just between the Galilean large moons, and the distribution of heavier molecules and atoms towards the inner system (Io + ...
AnarchoEngineer's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
877 views

Manned Spacecraft/Space Station design Requirements

I am looking for some document that summarizes all the aspects that need to be taken care of during design (structural resistance, life support system, thermal regulation, etc.). Something similar to ...
Saturn V's user avatar
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How long would it take to travel from the moon to the asteroid belt/Jupiter with fusion powered space travel?

I am writing a science fiction story that involves fusion powered space travel, but not constant acceleration like in the Expanse. Instead, the manned spacecraft accelerates at the beginning of the ...
Aelion's user avatar
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Has intra-cranial pressure been measured on ISS astronauts for SANS research?

Visual impairment (VI) <and spaceflight-associated neuro-ocular syndrome (SANS)> is currently ... NASA's top health risk for long duration spaceflight, and millions of dollars has been allocated ...
Woody's user avatar
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-7 votes
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Wouldn't it be easier to send human heads instead entire human bodies for space exploration? [closed]

A major part of what makes human space exploration extremely difficult is the infrastructure required to support the human body outside earth. It requires resources just to launch into space due to ...
ATL_DEV's user avatar
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Radiation Challenges of Crewed Gas Giant Missions

I was thinking about how easy it would be to perform a crewed tour of the Jovian/Saturnian moons, given the low DeltaV, and the abundant opportunities for potential ISRU. Then, I remembered with that ...
AnarchoEngineer's user avatar
3 votes
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Gemini Ejection seat usage during late stages of reentry

Gemini in one way or another was a somewhat unique spacecraft. One such unique feature was having a ejection seat. While reading trough the document Development and qualification of gemini escape ...
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21 votes
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Why will Starship's 150 ton payload capacity be sufficient to carry 100 people to other planets?

The ISS weighs 450 tons and carries 7 people for three months without resupply. Starship is supposed to carry 14 times as many people for more than twice the duration with one third the mass. How?
Abdullah is not an Amalekite's user avatar
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1 answer
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Has depleted uranium been considered for radiation shielding in crewed spacecraft beyond LEO?

Does Depleted Uranium (DU) have a role in spacecraft shielding? Crewed spacecraft require shielding to protect crew from hazards of space, particularly: Micrometors. The chief defense is a Whipple ...
Woody's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
183 views

Who was the first left handed astronaut (or cosmonaut) to orbit retrograde?

Most astronauts are right handed, and most crewed orbits are prograde. Who was the first retro lefty?
Woody's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
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Probability of centimeter scale meteoroids killing astronauts

The maximum impact velocity for a meteoroid orbiting the Sun is 72km/s at 1AU. At this velocity, it has an energy density of 2,592 MJ/kg, or 620kgTNT/kg. This means that a 10cm diameter sphere of ice ...
Abdullah is not an Amalekite's user avatar
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1 answer
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Closed Loop Space propulsion

While browsing for Space propulsion found this book : https://www.knygos.lt/lt/knygos/closed-loop-space-propulsion-new-faster-approach-2e4zy/ Closed Loop Space Propulsion New Faster Approach : The ...
Stoyan's user avatar
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27 votes
2 answers
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How much technical information is given to astronauts on a spaceflight? How much of it is left to the control center?

In many space exploration movies, we see that the control center, most notably the Mission Control Center has a team of engineers and scientists communicating with the astronauts regarding a variety ...
penguin99's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
491 views

How does SpaceX get through regulatory issues so quickly?

"Regulatory" isn't the right word, but I don't know what is. For example, SpaceX seemed to be able to prove to NASA's satisfaction that they were sufficiently safe to use for crewed launches ...
fectin's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
368 views

How many printed novels have been in space to date?

I am talking about actual novels brought for recreational purposes. As in manuals don't count. Also, I would like to know who and on what mission these were brought.
Starship - On Strike's user avatar
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1 answer
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Sending a Soyuz ship interplanetary - a plausible option?

This is my first time on Space Exploration SE, although I have participated quite a bit over on Worldbuilding. Anyway, as an avid sci-fi reader, I have been wondering if sending a Soyuz interplanetary ...
Lelu's user avatar
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5 votes
3 answers
2k views

Are fuel cells suitable for missions with high power requirements?

Are fuel cells suited for missions with high power requirements?
FalconHeavy321's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
98 views

Are most launches for science missions?

Are most space missions launched for scientific purposes? I had thought so, but during a group discussion, someone suggested most are actually for commercial purposes. Are they correct? Thanks!
FalconHeavy321's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
434 views

ESA: Does the ESA initiate the development of necessary new technologies if it is necessary? Does the ESA create new space missions?

I tried to do some research but I couldn’t find any definitive answer to this: Does the ESA initiate the development of necessary new technologies if it is necessary? And does the ESA create new space ...
FalconHeavy321's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
101 views

How heavy is an orbital pogo stick?

Moving people from a A to B in space often requires a significant change in velocity, requiring propellant eating into the mass budget. But most of this propellant is "wasted" in moving a ...
SE - stop firing the good guys's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
98 views

Was it possible to do a course correction on the planned manned Venus flyby?

Once the burn was complete, any remaining propellant would be vented to space, and then the larger fuel tank could be used as living space, while the smaller oxygen tank would be used for waste ...
The Rocket fan's user avatar
14 votes
5 answers
5k views

Is 2001: A Space Odyssey's Discovery One still a plausible design for interplanetary travel?

in 1968 Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke created 2001: A Space Odyssey. The interplanetary spacecraft, Discovery One, was considered scientifically feasible at the time. The design included in-...
Woody's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
221 views

What policies and capabilities are in place to induce hypothermia for the purpose of reducing hypoxic brain damage in EVA depressurization?

Depressurization incidents during EVA will have hypoxia as the ultimate cause of death or permanent brain damage. If an astronaut’s brain is deprived of oxygen, irreparable damage occurs after about 4 ...
Woody's user avatar
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4 votes
3 answers
626 views

Is a low-energy cruise an option for manned lunar flights?

Some lunar probes such as GRAIL travelled on a different trajectory to the Moon that went even much farther than the Moon itself is from Earth, to a Langrangian point, so why isn't this option ever ...
Nullnummer's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
771 views

What was the function of the Apollo Sextant Beam Splitter?

Operation of the Apollo Sextant Beam Splitter The Apollo optical Sextant is used to update the vehicles State Vector. It is capable of sighting two celestial targets simultaneously and measuring the ...
T.A. Neal's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
151 views

Can the resources of Titan be of any use for colonisation of the Saturn system [closed]

Will the resources of Titan aid outer solar system exploration? What does Titan have? Well: *Lakes of ethane and methane *Thick atmosphere, mostly nitrogen *Ices stored in the rocks (the rocks are ...
A. N Asker's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
127 views

Is having a natural satellite an advantage for colonising a planet or its satellite system?

Natural satellites contain resources and sometimes atmospheres, and are close to their parent and sometimes lots of other moons. Couldn’t we use a base there to colonise its parent or a neighbouring ...
A. N Asker's user avatar
12 votes
5 answers
2k views

Why does the presence of ice and organics (carbon, ammonia, water, etc) matter in space exploration?

For example, several missions have been launched just to find ice at the lunar poles. Why do astronomers and space agencies care so much about there being ice somewhere?
A. N Asker's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
63 views

What will be more important for the first NASA led human mission to Mars, the exploration of important science targets or the mining of water ice?

A few months after NASA's decision in November 2018 that Jezero Crater would be the landing site for the Mars 2020 rover mission, the research article The Geology and Astrobiology of McLaughlin Crater,...
Cornelis's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
399 views

How long would it take Starship to get to Neptune without any flybys?

After seeing this answer (https://space.stackexchange.com/a/60438/44505) saying that starship could get to Neptune, I wondered how long it would take to get to Neptune. Bonus question: Would it be ...
The Rocket fan's user avatar
10 votes
2 answers
2k views

Will SLS be launched as often as the space shuttle was?

Again, I did some research, and again, the results aren't that impressive. I was able to find that SLS is to become the " successor to the retired Space Shuttle, and the primary launch vehicle of ...
Deko Revinio's user avatar
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4 votes
3 answers
242 views

Mars crewed trip - earliest year technology was available?

With the technology built for the Moon landings, would it have been possible to send people to Mars? If no, what would have been the earliest year technology would have been available? @Fred said '...
Bob's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
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In the event of SRB ignition failure, could jettison of the other “lit” SRB prevent catastrophe?

Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) are popular launch boosters, used on the Space Shuttle, Ariane 5, Atlas V and SLV. However, SRBs have a number of failure modes, most of which result in catastrophe. ...
Woody's user avatar
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