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Questions tagged [crewed-spaceflight]

Crewed spaceflight (also referred to as human spaceflight or manned spaceflight) is space travel with a crew aboard the spacecraft. When a spacecraft is crewed, it can be operated directly, as opposed to being remotely operated or autonomous.

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How can an Astronaut survive for six days inside a Spacesuit?

In the video #AskNASA | What are the Next Generation Spacesuits?, spacesuit engineer Dustin Gohmert says the following about the Orion Crew Survival Suit (Orange Spacesuit): This suit is also ...
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Why weren't there any manned moon landings in the recent decades? [duplicate]

The last time a human landed on the moon was back in the 1970s. Why haven't there been any manned moon missions since? I understand that the US deemed them less important after winning the race to the ...
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How are astronauts in the ISS protected from electric shock?

On Earth, most of the electrical appliances having exposed metal parts, such as electric iron, are grounded, to protect the user from electric shock when an uninsulated-wire accidentally comes into ...
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How long to get to Geostationary Orbit? [closed]

Fictional Planet has a gravity of approximately 0.68g Geostationary orbit of said fictional planet is approximately 32,000 km above the surface according to online calculator. Spacecraft capable of ...
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What does this NASA administrator's tweeted statement mean? What is the context? [closed]

Background: Teslarati's NASA head calls out SpaceX CEO Elon Musk over Starship event in bizarre statement might serve as a resource for answers if the question is successfully reopened. Question: ...
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Term used to identify the blue bars/rails in the ISS?

The interior of the ISS is filled with blue bars used by astronauts to secure their feet and remain in one place. Does NASA have a term for these?
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Space adaptation syndrome compared to BPPV (vertigo)

Has there ever been any discussion comparing the typical SAS experience and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (when tiny calcium particles clump up in canals of the inner ear). Having recently ...
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1answer
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Tracking the Soyuz MS-15 approaching the ISS with binoculars

Next Wednesday, September 25th, the Soyuz MS-15 will be launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome. I guess the trip to the ISS will be long (6 hrs to 24 hr) as usual. I want to see both the ISS and the ...
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Aerosol products in space

I am assuming aerosol products are not used inside the living environment of a spacecraft while it is microgravity. Is that correct, or are there examples of such products being used while an ...
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Did Apollo carry and use WD40?

It appears from this question that Apollo missions carried Duct Tape and used it for in-flight fixups. Did they carry the other half of the "Universal Repair Kit" - WD40 (or similar)? If so, was it ...
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Were there any mission goals for the Apollo 18, 19, 20 flights?

I recently learned that Apollo 18, 19, and 20 missions were planned before they were canned due to budgetary reasons. I've only been able to find out the projected landing locations for these (...
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Help Finding A Book

I am trying to find the book that contains the following chapter: https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/avs/offices/aam/cami/library/online_libraries/aerospace_medicine/tutorial/...
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When a coronal mass ejection (CME) hits a spacecraft, from which direction will the particles come?

I have long assumed that when a CME (aka solar mass ejection, SME) hits a spacecraft, its particles will be coming in a straight line from the Sun. I've learned recently that it isn't so direct, and ...
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Has USSR/Russia launched humans on any rocket not derived from R-7?

The Soviet Union's first crewed launch, Vostok 1, was on a Vostok booster, derived from the R-7 ICBM and Sputnik satellite launcher with an additional stage added. The Soyuz boosters used today by ...
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Could NASA go back to the Moon? [closed]

Even after launching so many space missions, including the one which led Man to the Moon (Apollo 11, July 1969), NASA made several mistakes even in the space programs that followed. For e.g. Space ...
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Soyuz reentry acceleration profile with timing

I am looking for reentry Soyuz acceleration profile with timing. I was able to find graphs for ascent, but failed to find anything related with descent. The only thing I've got is Andreas Mogensen ...
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Where can I find Captain REFSMMAT?

One of the longer NASA acronyms is REFSMMAT (REFerence to a Stable Member MATrix) Ed Pavelka was one of the flight controllers who occupied the FIDO console at mission control. As a way to cement ...
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What was the volume of the Space Shuttle orbiter, not just the crew cabin or cargo bay but the total volume of the entire craft?

For context, after an in-depth Google search, I asked the question "What was the volume of the Space Shuttle orbiter, not just the crew cabin or cargo bay but the total volume of the entire craft?" on ...
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What makes Space Adaptation Syndrome worse?

Are there any particular movements or activities that exacerbate SAS, space sickness?
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What is the longest manned re-entry from Low Earth Orbit ever recorded?

What is the record for the longest amount of time that a manned spacecraft has taken to re-enter from low Earth orbit (LEO)? I would prefer the duration between the beginning of the re-entry burn ...
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What are the biological effects of a toe-to-head force gradient upon a human over the long term?

This question pertains to the notion of constructing rotating spacecraft and habs for human use in space in order to mitigate the effects of microgravity. Such craft have been a staple of many sci-fi ...
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What are the benefits of cryosleep?

NASA is working on a so-called 'Cryosleep Chamber', but why do they need it so badly? There must be a lot of benefits attached to this technology..
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Human-rating the Saturn V using modern standards

Would a complete Apollo-Saturn stack (like e.g. AS-506) be human-rated according to the latest human-rating process (NPR 8705.2C) of NASA? If not, what are the biggest show-stoppers? This question ...
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Is there a term for the activity of weightless astronauts hanging out on walls or ceilings?

Weightless astronauts often sit, stand, walk, or sleep on (or near) surfaces that (with gravity) we would normally call walls or ceilings. I reference such a phenomenon in my comment here: I would ...
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Project Mercury capsule switch orientation

I noticed that the majority of the toggle switches in the Mercury capsules move in a left-to-right manner. This seems unusual to me, since Gemini, Apollo and the Shuttle all predominantly use up-down ...
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Have any humans orbited the Earth in anything other than a prograde orbit?

As per the title, have any humans been launched into an orbit around the Earth which is anything other than prograde? E.g. retrograde or polar.
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Is the vestibular system ever useful in spaceflight?

The Vintage Space video Eleven Deaf Men Helped NASA Leave Earth describes a number of different NASA experiments done on human subjects who had damaged vestibular systems due to childhood illness. ...
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What were the “pills” that were added to solid waste in Apollo 7?

In the BBC News Worldservice podcast 10, 9, 8, 7: The dramatic missions that made the Moon landing possible told by retired astronaut Nicole Stott (Expeditions 20, 21, STS-128 and STS-133) after ...
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Why did the number of recovery ships decrease with time?

This NASA page names the various ocean ships that have helped recover NASA spacecraft. There is a general trend that later missions used fewer ships. Read the link for details, but here are some ...
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What do astronauts do with their trash on the ISS?

Astronauts often stay more than a year on the ISS, they produce trash like any other human. Is there like a limit that they may produce ever day or maybe some measures were put in place to reduce the ...
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What is the connection (if any) between the new Artemis mission and the two Artemis spacecraft (Themis-B, -C)?

It has been announced that the culmination of Space Policy Directive 1, the goal to land Americans and specifically the first woman on the Moon, at it's south pole in 2024 will be called "Artemis". ...
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Why doesn't NASA plan a manned Venus flyby first? [closed]

After America will have returned to the Moon, why won't NASA make a Venus flyby mission with the Orion/SLS before going on to manned flights to Mars? They are planning crewed missions to Venus (...
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Outer space and dark-adapted vision

Does being in outer space, without the glare of the Sun, have any impact on human vision? Is dark-adapted vision improved when astronauts are orbiting the Earth and in its shadow?
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Why was Gemini VIII terminated after recovering from the OAMS thruster failure?

This NASA source states that the mission was terminated after Neil Armstrong used 75% of the RCS propellent to cancel the rotation from the OAMS thruster failure. If the mission had enough RCS left to ...
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1answer
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Have there been (more) reflights of a manned space mission?

In recent question about color blindness there was an interesting fact about two back-to-back space shuttle missions, STS-83 and STS-94, that were flown with same shuttle and same crew with only few ...
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Can there be color blind astronauts?

This answer begins with: It appears to have actually been a pole, not a cord. Handrails and handholds, colored blue for quick identification, were located throughout Skylab. ...
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1answer
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Did the manned NASA capsules rotate during descent?

Watching the NS-11 launch, I noticed that during descent when the main chutes were deployed, the capsule rotated quite a bit, and would rotate back. Was this an issue as well during the Mercury/...
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Two stage reentry from Moon/Mars

There are a number of questions addressing the desirability and/or feasibility of a slower reentry from Earth orbit in order to reduce thermal load. At least most of them run into the problem that ...
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At what surface gravity can't astronauts do full steps anymore?

We know that on the Moon in ~1/6 g the Apollo astronauts couldn't make full steps because they jumped with each step. At what surface gravity could you walk more like on Earth and at what gravity ...
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What set of units does the Orion capsule cockpit instrumention use?

Shuttle was English, ISS is metric. What's Orion? For example: What units are inertial velocity displayed in?
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How was Skylab's orbit inclination chosen?

As referenced in this question, there were a number of early spaceflight missions at higher inclination than may be expected (given limited payload capability, higher inclination further limits ...
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Why Orion can't be used to service JWST?

Hubble Space Telescope is a marvel of astronomical tools - particularly judging by how much it moved the science. It took a lot of fixes along the way, which certainly prolonged its useful life. Its ...
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How to build a space catapult large enough to shoot a one hundered thousand ton spaceship in to low orbit?

I assume calculations start with the payload weight. A massive foundation would be needed lots of concrete and rebar meters thick. Also a harmonically sealed tunnel a thousand miles long filled with ...
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How effective is the Orion radiation protection plan?

This article gives a basic overview of the procedure for astronauts on deep space missions who need to take shelter from energetic events such as solar flares. The shelter area strongly resembles a ...
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Would high altitude native populations make better astronauts for a Mars mission?

High altitude populations in Tibet, the Andes, and Ethiopia have genetic adaptations that allow them to better handle low oxygen levels. They are also used to colder and drier climates. And lastly ...
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1answer
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Fuel vs food on the trip to Mars?

How much food for each person is need and fuel per various engine to go to Mars on the current 9-month trip there then 3 months on Mars and the 9 months back? Can time be saved on the trip to and from ...
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Instead of approaching Mars from behind can we approach Mars from the front of its orbital path? [closed]

Nine months is what google maps said to get to Mars. I would like to know if fuel was no expense how long could we get to Mars other than the method below? Is the 9 months and the method just what our ...
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1answer
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Could the Saturn V actually have launched astronauts around Venus?

One of the more interesting proposed uses of a Saturn V was to launch a manned flyby of Venus. Some of the cargo would have been stored inside the tank of the upper stage, which would be retained ...
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1answer
825 views

What is the orbital boost acceleration of the ISS?

How much acceleration does the International Space Station experience during its orbital adjustment boosts? How much thrust and for how long? Bonus question: what is the highest acceleration that the ...
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why do astronauts in the ISS still use wired microphones?

While I watched the DM-1 hatch opening, I noticed that astronauts use the wired microphone to talk to Huston. It was particularly strange seeing that even because during hatch opening, they were ...