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Questions tagged [failure]

Questions regarding missions or parts of missions which were not successful.

18
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1answer
301 views

How easy would opening an Apollo capsule following dry landing be?

To help frame the problem, I have written the following scenario: It's December 19, 1972 and the Apollo 17 has returned to Earth, but something went wrong and they landed in the middle of the Outback....
11
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1answer
351 views

Did the crew of Soyuz MS-10 pass the Karman Line?

Just wondering if Nick Hague got his gold astronaut wings.
17
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1answer
1k views

Was the LES used in the MS-10 abort?

I can find no clear information regarding the use of the launch escape system in today's Soyoz MS-10 abort-to-ground. The failure seems to occur just as LES jettison is scheduled to take place. The ...
2
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1answer
52 views

What is a “delta-qualification” program?

In the NASA Independent Review of the Antares Orb-3 failure, they refer to a "delta-qualification program": As a result, this area of the turbopump is vulnerable to oxygen fire and failures. The ...
33
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3answers
4k views

Do rockets, launch vehicles or spacecraft contain a black-box?

Like aeroplanes, do rockets also contains some black-box kind of thing to see what went wrong at the time of failure?
6
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2answers
941 views

Post processing of destruction of a rocket

If a rocket fails whether on the launch pad or after the lift-off, how is it determined what component failed? What are the different methods by which failure is determined?
5
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1answer
131 views

What are some practices Space Exploration that are no longer acceptable?

I'm sure that for every good idea that made it into a spaceship design, there had to be plenty of bad ideas. There's most likely a bunch of old designs (or practices) that passed previously, but would ...
4
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4answers
494 views

Could Dick Scobee have flown a RTLS on Challenger 51L

In a previous question, I explored whether or not, with a call up from an observant Flight Controller, the SRB’s could be separated from the STS-51L stack before the destruction of the ET tank at 73 ...
13
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1answer
963 views

How does an array of concrete pillars protect a launch control bunker?

This answer explains that this regular grid of concrete posts at Baikonur LC-1 Gagarin's Start is designed to reduce damage to the launch control bunker beneath it in the event of a catastrophic ...
3
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0answers
74 views

What could be used to associate these fairing halves with their launches?

Eric Ralph's Teslarati article SpaceX’s BFR factory in LA spied with four Falcon 9 fairing halves shows several panoramic photos of the site for the future rocket factory. In it, the author says: ...
5
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0answers
111 views

What was the design failure that Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory is alluding to?

I was looking through old saved urls and when an old Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory press release link didn't work, it sent me to the PageNotFound page, where I saw the image below. It ...
7
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1answer
209 views

What does a company do after a failed satellite launch?

What does a company (or government organization) do when a launch fails and the satellite they purchased to be put into orbit is lost? For the sake of the discussion, assume they have launch insurance....
3
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1answer
183 views

Which engine failed during CRS-1?

During SpaceX's CRS-1 mission, "engine 1" failed, but the booster still completed its primary mission due to a plentiful thrust and fuel margin. Clearly, an outboard engine failure is more critical ...
14
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1answer
414 views

Historically, how risky are first launches of new rockets?

Apropos of the Falcon Heavy test flight scheduled for February 6, 2018, what is the failure rate of first launches of new orbital rocket designs? How has this rate changed over time since the 1950s? ...
32
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3answers
5k views

Will the Falcon Heavy be far enough in 12 seconds to not cause damage?

Elon Musk has stated that he will consider it a success if the Falcon Heavy gets far enough away from the launch pad to not cause damage if it blows up. The Falcon Heavy underwent a 12 second static ...
17
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2answers
4k views

Will the James Webb Space Telescope be insured against launch failure?

Most commercial satellites are insured in case something happens on launch. Although the Ariane 5 is a fairly reliable rocket, a launch failure is not out of the question. While other questions have ...
1
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0answers
122 views

Databases of “scrubbed” launch attempts?

I'm curious if there is a statistically demonstrable tendency not to schedule launches on certain days, such as those that contain leap seconds (see answers below this question), year changes, or ...
5
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2answers
390 views

What was the “sour milk smell” during the 1967 Apollo 1 testing?

In the first edition of Andrew Chaikin's 1994 book, "A Man on the Moon, there is a paragraph in chapter 1 which talks about troubles the Apollo 1 testing crew were going through. Chaikin states that ...
0
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1answer
124 views

Are there any procedures against biohazard containment failure on ISS?

This question might be more of a sci-fi question, so forgive me. It was inspired on behalf of the movie Life (2017) where the crew aboard the ISS catch a soil sample from Mars, and discover that it ...
7
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1answer
920 views

Was a method available to save the Challenger Crew?

In a previous thread, I asked the question of the likelihood of the STS stack surviving an early separation of the SRB using the SRB manual separation switch on panel C3: Could the SRB's have ...
1
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0answers
156 views

Does a safety team get fined if a rocket launch fails due to the safety of the rocket?

I was writing a story and I wanted to write about this topic but I could not find a straight answer from any website. Please help
13
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0answers
122 views

When have secondary payloads damaged the primary payload of a launcher?

Primary payload customers have traditionally been cautious when allowing secondary payloads on the same launcher. For example, a secondary payload is not trusted to have its own chemical propulsion ...
6
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0answers
163 views

Were solar concentrators on HS-702 just a stop-gap measure until triple-junction PV cells were available?

According to Gunter's Space Page discussion of early versions of the Hughes HS-702 Bus: The first version of the 702 used solar arrays with concentrators. These concentrators tended to early ...
15
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3answers
1k views

Has Max-Q historically been a common failure point in rocket launches?

I believe that it's common knowledge that Max-Q is the point in which a rocket is undergoing the maximum dynamic stress during a launch and ascent. But, how often have rockets actually been destroyed ...
9
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2answers
541 views

How do spacecraft measure their own charge?

The discussion in the NOAA legacy page Space Weather Prediction Center Topic Paper: Satellites and Space Weather (found here) lists: Types of Spacecraft Anomalies Spacecraft anomalies are ...
2
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1answer
186 views

Failure modes of segmented solid rocket boosters

The Rogers Commission Report (PDF, page 73) describes the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters as [...] a faulty design unacceptably sensitive to a number of factors. These factors were the ...
9
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2answers
583 views

Final conclusion/description of the cause of the SpaceX Sept. 1, 2016 anomaly?

I've just read the phys.org new item which summarizes the conclusions by SpaceX about the cause of the September 1st 2016 anomaly. I'm citing quotes in the news item which come from a SpaceX ...
10
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2answers
380 views

How can just making the ground broadcast stronger neutralize a zombie(sat)?

In April of 2010 the Geo-not-so-stationary satellite Galaxy-15 stopped responding to ground commands. It operates as a "bent-pipe" or Transponder system, which means - roughly speaking - it will ...
7
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1answer
245 views

Insight on EDM Schiaparelli's IMU error and subsequent failed landing

Read this SpaceNews article which states,'1 second of Inertial Measurement error' caused the devastation in the Schiaparelli's landing sequence, causing it to free fall for 3.7 kms. What is exactly ...
11
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2answers
427 views

What happens next if the root cause of one rocket failure won't be identified?

Supposing that in a rocket failure engineers don't find what the root cause was, what will happen next? In general if the root cause will never be fully understood is there a law, rule, or standard ...
6
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1answer
593 views

Is this explanation for the SpaceX 1-Sept-2016 anomaly plausible?

Question: Is this explanation for the SpaceX 1-Sept-2016 anomaly plausible? Or most of it at least (sans LHe)? In the recent New Atlas article SpaceX fingers helium as cause of Falcon 9 rocket ...
18
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1answer
1k views

Why is the F9-029 Amos 6 case more complex than the F9-020 CRS-7 explosion?

In the F9-029 Amos 6 mission failure at the launch pad, a "fast fire" happened near the 2nd stage of Falcon 9 FT. In F9-020 CRS-7 mission, an explosion happened in flight (again in the 2nd stage) a ...
6
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2answers
525 views

Why was OSIRIS-REx almost destroyed because of a loss of pressure following the SpaceX “fast fire”?

In the news item on the website of ABC's affiliate station WFTV in Florida Official: SpaceX explosion nearly destroyed asteroid-seeking OSIRIS-REx spacecraft, there is discussion of a loss of pressure ...
2
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1answer
230 views

What was the cause of the second explosion in SpaceX's pad “Fast Fire”?

This is well after the first and second stage were gone, so I suspect it was something about the pad itself that resulted in the second explosion event. Any ideas?
5
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2answers
459 views

How can the elements involved in loading a LOX tank be involved in an explosion?

Since SpaceX has isolated the AMOS-6 Falcon 9 pad explosion to the upper stage LOX tank during fueling, it seems useful to consider in general terms what was happening at the time and what materials ...
3
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1answer
732 views

What is the advantage of doing a static test fire before launch?

Continuing the series of questions (part 1, part 2) inspired by the recent loss of the AMOS-6 satellite during a static test fire, here's one thing that puzzles me a bit: What kinds of problems is a ...
37
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3answers
4k views

Why was AMOS-6 mounted on the rocket for a test fire?

I understand that the static test is a general test of pre-launch procedures, but risking a multi-million dollar payload for a test seems remarkable. Couldn't they use a mass simulator or something? ...
15
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1answer
14k views

What does 'Switch SCE to AUX' mean?

During the launch of Apollo 12 a major malfunction was caused by 2 lightning strikes. See http://www.realclearscience.com/blog/2013/02/apollo-12-struck-by-lightning.html for more info. The solution ...
6
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1answer
501 views

What rocket launch protocols (if any) are in place to prevent premature or late intentional self-destruct?

There's a few related questions about rocket self-destruct mechanisms here already, e.g.: How are self-destructs implemented in rocketry? (covers how they work) Do all launches include self-destruct ...
3
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1answer
123 views

Summary of events and issues leading to the loss of Hitomi?

Hitomi was an Astrophysics science satellite in LEO with four X-ray telescopes, for imaging and spectroscopy of soft and hard X-rays. A paper based on some of the data collected during it's short ...
5
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0answers
73 views

Is there a website or database which lists launch vehicle accidents and reasons in detail?

Looking for online databases or printed compilations of launch vehicle accidents, mistakes done while fabricating rockets and preventive measure taken.
19
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4answers
4k views

Is SpaceX the only launch service provider who can attempt another launch the next day after a scrub?

Is SpaceX really the only launch service provider, who can attempt another launch the very next day after a scrub? While other providers may need weeks of preparations before another try. If that is ...
3
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1answer
78 views

How will Philae's power failure affect Rosetta's mission?

With Philae dead on the comet, how will Rosetta's mission change? Obviously there isn't anything more that the lander can do, so Rosetta doesn't have to use its time and resources trying to wake it up....
1
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1answer
346 views

What are the causes of Reaction Wheel Failures/Anomalies? [duplicate]

What are the mechanisms of reaction wheel anomalies? Are there any fish bone or fault tree analyses on these issues?
5
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1answer
364 views

Why couldn't the Falcon 1 flight 3 launch make it to orbit?

I've looked for better explanation, and all I can get is: Stage separation occurred as planned, but because residual fuel in the new Merlin 1C engine evaporated and provided transient thrust, the ...
2
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0answers
76 views

How does SpaceX determine mission success [closed]

In a tweet https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/678679083782377472 Mr Musk states that they are using Monte Carlo analysis to determine mission success. My Question(s): how does that work exactly? ...
12
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1answer
2k views

What would have happened if only one Space Shuttle SRB ignited?

The ignite command for the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB) would not be issued unless all three Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME) were at least 90% of thrust. The launch would have been aborted if one or ...
8
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2answers
325 views

When did Kepler roll over and how does it match the anomalies of KIC 8462852?

The Kepler space telescope, during its first mission, rolled over four times per year in order to keep its heat shield facing the Sun. At what dates (in that BJD time format) was this done during the ...
7
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3answers
746 views

Could a communication satellite that fails to reach GEO be repurposed?

When a launcher's upper stage fails to put a commercial communication satellite in geostationary orbit, it cannot be used as intended. But could it be used in satellite-to-satellite communication ...
33
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3answers
4k views

What would NASA have done if they knew Columbia was catastrophically damaged?

When the Columbia Shuttle broke apart in 2003, it was known after the launch that a piece of foam had fallen and hit the Shuttle. NASA apparently chose not to investigate it as well as they could have....