Questions tagged [lagrangian-points]

Lagrangian points (also Lagrange points, L-points, or libration points) are the five positions (L1 - L5) surrounding two celestial bodies where gravitational pull of the two large mass bodies provides the centripetal force required to orbit them. Such points are usually nominally unstable but somewhat periodic around celestial systems with stable orbits.

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What does the term “libration point gateway” mean?

In the Circular Restricted Three Body Problem, natural paths exist between periodic orbits or the libration points that have negligible cost. These are commonly known as free transfers between ...
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How Moon and other planets affect Earth-Sun lagrange points locations?

We can calculate Earth-Sun Lagrange points based on Sun & earth mass/gravity. However moon and other planets must be affecting the location of these points. How this effect is analyzed and exact ...
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Are some Halo Orbits actually Stable?

UPDATE: I found another reference! While I always enjoy a good video starring Jimmy and Linda Carter, this one has Dennis Wingo describing ISEE-3's original Halo orbit. He describes Sun-Earth $L_1$ as ...
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When will DSCOVR appear too close to the Sun for reliable downlinking?

DSCOVR is in a Lissajous orbit about the Sun-Earth L2 point. That the orbit is called Lissajous rather than halo means that it's periods of horizontal libration and vertical libration are not equal. ...
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Who called the Lagrangian points as “Libration” points and and why was the terminology “Libration” used?

I am curious about the naming and why were the equilibrium solutions of the CR3BP called as Libration points? Who called them that and what is the history behind it?
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How should I understand these phrases in this paper on orbit transfers?

I am studying this article on orbital mechanics and can't understand the meaning of some terms related to mathematics (perhaps because my native language doesn't have such terms). I created the same ...
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Is the L2 Mars-Sun point protected from solar radiation?

To what extent is the L2 point protected in comparison to the surface, if at all? Since the L2 point might be in the umbra of Mars, it could be shielded against the sun. It would also be helpful if ...
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What is the radiation level at the L2 Mars-Sun point?

This answer shows that the radiation levels at the L2 Mars-Sun point will be lower because it lies within Mars' solar umbra. So what will the level of radiation be at the L2 Mars-Sun point? Also, how ...
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How can you construct the periodic orbits around libration points L1 and L2 in the circular restricted three-body problem and prove their existence?

Following up on a previous question about the classification of periodic orbits, how can they be constructed, especially the planar Lyapunov family, around libration points $L_1$ and $L_2$? And how ...
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Could a solar sail composed of smart glass stay near the L1 point of Venus?

From answers to this question i've learned that the Lagrangian L$_1$ point of Venus is not stable, despite the almost circular orbit of the planet and the fact that it has no moon. Nevertheless would ...
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For how long do the various earth-moon lagrangian points receive sunlight each month?

Every month the earth-moon lagrangian points must be in the shade of the moon for some time For L1 and L3 probably on new moons, for L2 probably on full moons, and for L4 and L5 maybe when the moon ...
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Does it even make sense to talk about Mercury's triangular libration points (L4, L5)?

The recent question How much radiation shielding would be required for a habitat at Mercury–Sun L5? got me thinking. There are a large number of disadvantages and challenges to building or putting a ...
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Fastest time to Sun Earth L2 (or L1)?

Of all the past, present or planned probes to SE-L2 (or L1*) which has or will take the shortest amount of time to arrive from leaving low earth orbit, or from passing that location if the probe doesn'...
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How Many Martian Lagrange points are there? …And are they useful for satellites?

I know that the Sun-Earth system has 5 Lagrange points, and there are five more Earth-Moon associated Lagrange points; so ten in all that are in some way associated with the Earth. Since Mars has two ...
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Do Lagrange points still exist if there is significant radiation pressure on the third body from the first?

From this answer: To obtain the distance to L1, find the smallest value of $r$ such that $$\frac{M_2}{r_1^2} + \frac{M_1}{R^2} - \frac{r_1(M_1+M_2)}{R^3} - \frac{M_1}{(R-r_1)^2} = 0.$$ To ...
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How far would the Mars L1 Lagrangian Point be from Mars?

I am a sci-fi writer, and I've heard about the concept of putting some type of magnetic deflector near the Sun-Mars L1 point to deflect charged particles from the Sun to reduce radiation effects on ...
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How likely will the James Webb Telescope encounter debris trapped at L2?

Do Lagrangian points collect micro-meteorites similar to how the Pacific trash vortex collects debris? I was wondering if the James Webb Telescope will have to clear its Lagrange point before ...
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Efficient trajectories from earth orbit to EML-1

What are the lowest delta-v trajectories a spacecraft could take from Earth to EML-1? (Earth Moon Lagrange point 1). provided the payload is massive. ( the amount of time it takes is not an issue)
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How big would a collection of asteroids near the Moon's L4 point need to be to aggregate naturally into a “stepping stone” for space exploration?

Wouldn't it be useful to catch few meter sized near-Earth asteroids whenever opportunity knocks and "lock them up" at the L4 Langrangian point of our Moon ? Although at the L4 and L5 Lagrangian ...
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Would it be possible to Boost ISS to L1 or Lunar Orbit?

NASA and Russia plan to retire the ISS before 2030, and to launch a new lunar outpost to lunar orbit. This output could then be a gateway to future mission to Mars or the outer solar system. My ...
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Do objects at the $L_4$ and $L_5$ points conserve angular momentum?

A planet in an elliptical orbit around a star conserves angular momentum. (This is tantamount to saying that it sweeps out equal areas of the ellipse in equal times). If conditions are such that ...
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Can a whole planetary system have Lagrangian points?

Wikipedia says: The Lagrange points mark positions where the combined gravitational pull of the two large masses provides precisely the centripetal force required to orbit with them The major bulk ...
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Stability of Lissajous orbits around Sun-Venus L1

How far is it from the Venus? Does Mercury gives too big perturbations for a stable Lissajous orbit?
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Is this what station keeping maneuvers look like, or just glitches in data? (SOHO via Horizons)

I've been enjoying the JPL Horizons web interface and after I discovered the incredibly extensive database associated with SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, also see sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov) ...
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Why put X-ray telescope Spektr-RG/eROSITA all the way out at Sun-Earth L2?

Per Wikipedia's Spektr-RG; Mission profile and orbit: Mission profile and orbit The spacecraft will enter an orbit around the Sun, at the L2 Lagrangian point, about 1.5 million kilometers away ...
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Any satellites in Earth-Sun L3 point?

Do we (the humanity) have any satellites in the Sun-Earth $L_3$ point? If not, then what are the plans to put some ships into this point?
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Can the James Webb Space Telescope basically manage its own orbit if necessary?

In this great answer I learned that the Mars rover Curiosity can be given some tasks and it will go ahead and manage the work and navigation by itself, to at least a certain limit. The James Webb ...
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How many satellites can stay in a Lagrange point?

Lagrange points as I understand it are points in space between 2 objects where the gravitational pull between them is effectively equal. That makes station keeping at these points relatively easy. ...
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Is it obvious or easily-proven that L4 and L5 must be in the parental orbital plane?

Looking at the question and answer and diagrams from Are Lagrangian points associated only with the smaller body? got me wondering. L4 and L5 each form an equilateral triangle with the two main ...
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Are Lagrangian points associated only with the smaller body?

Diagrams of Lagrangian points I've seen always show the points near the smaller object, following its orbit about the larger one. For instance: from Wikipedia. But in fact the smaller object ...
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What is the required burn to keep a satellite at a Lagrangian point?

When a satellite reaches a Lagrangian point, it has a non-zero velocity $v_1$ because of the transfer orbit in which it had already been. What burn, say, $\Delta v$, one needs if the satellite is ...
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Delta V to get to the Sun-Earth Lagrange Point 1?

For any of these starting positions, GEO, GTO, EM-L2 or EM-L4/5, which would require the least delta-V to get to Sun-Earth L1? How much delta-V would it require? Would this chart help in identifying ...
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Details about traveling from EM-L2 to SE-L1

Would the optimal time to launch be when the Moon was on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun? What direction would be optimal leaving EM-L2, radially away from the moon? Is the last line of ...
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Could JWST stay at L2 “forever”?

Using only reaction wheels powered by solar panel and the sunshield as a sail (in continuous active attitude control) to generate thrust from solar photon pressure in the desired direction, could JWST ...
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Do horseshoe orbits have anything to do with Lagrange points? Do words fail us here?

I said (2010 SO16 is associated with Lagrange point L3 but wanders so far behind and ahead of it that the orbit is called "horseshoe"... and the comment was made: Not really. L3 is unstable. ...
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Ordering of the Lagrange points

Is there any basis for the ordering of the L-points? Specifically, is there any particular reason for choosing L1 as the first L-point?
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How could transfers between SEL1&2 and EML Lagrange points be utilized?

The Earth has 7 Lagrange points nearby since SEL1 and SEL2 (Sun-Earth Lagrange points 1 and 2, respectively) are only between 3 and 5 LD (lunar distances) away from the five EML (Earth-Moon Lagrange) ...
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How will JWST maintain its elliptical orbit around L2?

I understand that JWST will have a vertical elliptical orbit around L2, but what I don't understand is how the telescope will actually maintain an orbit if there is no body in L2 to actually orbit ...
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L2 point in multi-moon system

For an SF novel, if there were two large moons orbiting a planet, let's say one moon the size of Earth's moon and the 2nd moon about 20% larger, and the planet roughly the size of the Earth, would the ...
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Does launching to interplanetary space from LEO require the least delta-v?

Based on this chart from wikipedia, (I do not know if I am reading it correctly) This all assumes LEO-Eq LEO to C3/0=3.22 LEO to GEO to C3/0=3.9+1.3=5.2 LEO to EML-1 to C3/0=3.77+0.14=3.91 LEO to ...
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Are large halo orbits around L₁'s and L₂'s preferred over small orbits for reasons other than geometry?

There have been many examples of the placement of satellites in orbits around Lagrange points, most have been sun-earth and earth-moon $L_1$ and $L_2$ due to their proximity to earth. In each case ...
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Gravity cancellation point [closed]

Here is a question from ANTHE: an exam in India. The question is:Two point masses M and 3M are placed at a L distance apart. Another point mass m is between on the line joining them so that the net ...
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Nature of Hayabusa-2's “Home Position” relative to Ryugu? Is it Ruygu's L1?

This tweet "from Hayabusa-2" via JAXA shows the diagram below, which seems to suggest that the Hayabusa-2 spacecraft tends to remain between the asteroid Ryugu and the Sun. Does Hayabusa-2 have to ...
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Why won't JWST deploy in LEO where it is potentially serviceable?

The James Webb Space Telescope will deploy (unfold mechanically) while on the way to L2. Couldn't it do so in LEO, where it is potentially serviceable? Starliner CST-100 and Dragon are planned to soon ...
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Is there a synchronous orbital height for Phobos?

My assumption is that any body in the solar system would have it's own specific geo-synchronous orbit height. But when I took a look at Phobos and calculated the GEO height based on the simple formula ...
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Do Lagrangian points apply to eccentric orbits or binary systems?

The assumptions about the Lagrangian points being stable (...in the traditional meaning of the word: not moving around; they are unstable in the mathematical sense, except for arguably L4, L5) that I'...
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Low Energy Transfer within Earth-Moon system

Practical aspects of a total low energy transfer to the Moon have been seen in missions like GENESIS, which uses Weak stability Boundary legs of Earth and Sun to reach ESL-2. This four body model ...
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What does the Sun-Earth-Moon system look like from the Sun-Earth L-2 point?

The L-2 point of the Sun-Earth system is away from the Earth on the night-side of the Earth; i.e. it's always local midnight at the sub-satellite point. This is an attractive property for some ...
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Why are so many space telescopes placed in LEO instead of at Lagrange Points? And why do we hear about Hubble more than any Langrange-orbit telescope?

Here is the list of every space telescope launched by different space agencies - List of space telescopes. Most of the listed telescopes are placed in Lower Earth Orbit (about 95% of them). It's ...
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How does the delta V to reach and orbit L4 and L5 compare to entering orbit around the Moon?

The L4 and L5 Lagrange points, 60 degrees in front of and behind the Moon in its orbit around Earth, orbit at the same speed as the Moon. But when a spacecraft flies to the Moon, the gravity of the ...