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Questions tagged [lift]

In aeronautics, lift is a component of aerodynamic force that acts perpendicular to drag, and balances the weight of the aircraft against the effects of gravity to achieve flight. In astronautics however, the lift component of a flight of the spacecraft is a force directly negating and greater of the effects of gravity and atmospheric drag on the body of the spacecraft as it gains altitude, a distance between itself and the body it is lifting off from.

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What would a “Kármán plane” look like, a bird, or a plane?

If I understand correctly (which I might not), the Kármán line is roughly the altitude where a "Kármán plane's" upward lift force at the orbital velocity for that altitude would be equal in magnitude ...
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Challenging the Kármán line from above

The initial conditions of the thought experiment is (very) LEO / reentry. capsules, space shuttle and other spacecraft can generate lift in upper atmosphere during reentry, in order to reduce ...
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Just how much can tall skinny rockets bend? (roughly, safely)

Below is a GIF I prepared and used in an earlier question, and the answer seems quite reasonable. With a height to diameter ratio of about 70 m to 3.7 m (nearly 20:1) a weight-conscious design, ...
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Is aerodynamic lift ever useful in rocket flight?

When a rocket is traveling through an atmosphere, the component of the aerodynamic force in the direction of motion is called drag, and the component perpendicular to that is called lift. Usually a ...
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Can it be calculated that near the Kármán line the lifting force equals the centrifugal force?

According to Wikipedia about the Kármán line: In the final chapter of his autobiography Kármán adresses the issue of the edge of outer space: ...or 24 miles up. At this altitude and speed, ...
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Is the definition of the Kármán line from Wikipedia right? [closed]

Edit: this question is about making clear that the Wikipedia's article about the Kármán line is an interpretation, not the definition ! Why not consider the Kármán line as a curved boundary that ...
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Why is using a space elevator cheaper than rocket power?

Why is rocket power so much less efficient? In both cases you want to lift a given weight a certain height. What does climbing a tether give you that you don't have when using rockets? Wouldn't a ...
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Rocket drag and lift based on flight direction - in which frame of reference?

Drag is aerodynamic force component parallel to the direction of motion. Lift is aerodynamic force component perpendicular to the direction of motion. Direction of motion with respect to what? 1) ...
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Would an ionocraft have better or worse performance in the upper atmosphere?

The ionocraft produces lift by accelerating ions in the air downward by the use of two meshes held at a large relative voltage difference. With a cursory look at the physical principle, it seems like ...
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Is it correct to apply the vis-viva equation to an airplane that flies in a straight line at the Kármán line?

The vis-viva equation models the motion of an orbiting body and it applies when the only force acting on the body is it's own weight. So is it correct to apply this equation to an airplane that ...