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Questions tagged [reduced-gravity-sports]

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49 votes
6 answers
11k views

Can/should you swim in zero G?

Inspired by Are there types of animals that can't make the trip to space? (physiologically) and related to but not a duplicate of Can you swim in space? Swimming on the Moon / in low gravity looks ...
Baldrickk's user avatar
  • 2,426
27 votes
2 answers
6k views

How does one throw a boomerang in space? Does it return?

From today's BBC's Japan developing wooden satellites to cut space junk: "We are very concerned with the fact that all the satellites which re-enter the Earth's atmosphere burn and create tiny ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
26 votes
3 answers
15k views

Why is it so hard to walk on the Moon?

In videos of astronauts walking on the Moon, it seems very hard to move around with any efficiency, and it seems impossible to run. Why is this? What could be done to mitigate these effects?
user avatar
22 votes
3 answers
3k views

Qualitative differences between gravity and a spinning habitat

I'm aware that living in a spinning habitat has a couple of noticeable differences from being on terra firma. For instance, running in the direction of the spin ought to make you feel heavier, while ...
Ingolifs's user avatar
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18 votes
4 answers
5k views

How would swimming on Mars feel, given the lower gravity?

The hypothetical swimming pool is inside a habitat at atmospheric pressure, and on Mars at 0.38g of Earth. What are the major differences regarding water properties (viscosity, surface tension, ...
drandrul's user avatar
  • 658
17 votes
2 answers
3k views

What would ice-skating be like on Europa?

Jovian moon Europa's icy surface is pretty flat and let's say astronauts would wear ice skates attached to their spacesuits, what would ice-skating be like on Europa? Due to Europa's very low gravity (...
LoveForChrist's user avatar
13 votes
1 answer
1k views

Did NASA tell the Skylab astronauts to "Stop running around!"?

This answer to the question starts with: This video may help to answer your question. Starting at about 00:24, you can see an astronaut running around the "exercise wheel" of Skylab (an early NASA ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
13 votes
1 answer
324 views

At what surface gravity can't astronauts do full steps anymore?

We know that on the Moon in ~1/6 g the Apollo astronauts couldn't make full steps because they jumped with each step. At what surface gravity could you walk more like on Earth and at what gravity ...
Guest55's user avatar
  • 179
12 votes
3 answers
2k views

Can you ride a bicycle on Deimos?

Deimos is the small moon of Mars. The surface gravity is 0.003m/s2 (compare to Earth @ 9.807 m/s2). In theory a person with a bicycle could launch from and land on Deimos with a bicycle and a ramp. ...
James Jenkins's user avatar
12 votes
2 answers
341 views

Is the vestibular system ever useful in spaceflight?

The Vintage Space video Eleven Deaf Men Helped NASA Leave Earth describes a number of different NASA experiments done on human subjects who had damaged vestibular systems due to childhood illness. ...
uhoh's user avatar
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11 votes
1 answer
5k views

What would the human gait look like on Mars?

Is there an approximation of what a human would look like walking on Mars? Would it be closer to how the astronauts walked on the Moon or the way we walk on the Earth? With the gravitational ...
Bob516's user avatar
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11 votes
1 answer
1k views

Designing a bicycle for Mars?

Assuming that Elon Musk's plan to send colonists to Mars is successful and I'm one of the chosen few, and assuming there's the mass budget for it, can I take my bicycle with me? What difficulties ...
Roger Lipscombe's user avatar
11 votes
1 answer
1k views

Can humans play basketball in simulated gravity?

Rotating a spacecraft to create a simulated 1 g should cure most medical problems with microgravity. But can one play ball? A rotating spacecraft with several 10s or 100 meter to the center of ...
LocalFluff's user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
25k views

When was there a dog in ISS's Kibo module?

The interesting question What living organisms adapt to 0 gravity? includes several GIF images. One if them is shown below, that of (apparently) a dog in a NASA suit floating around in the ISS's ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
9 votes
2 answers
10k views

Will colonists on Mars have enhanced physical mobility relative to an Earth-normal environment?

A Princess of Mars (1912) by Edgar Rice Burroughs in Chapter III describes this "superhuman leap" by the hero John Carter: My effort was crowned with a success which appalled me no less than it ...
James Jenkins's user avatar
9 votes
4 answers
2k views

What happens if you jump on a "spin ship"?

If you're on a spin ship, or rotating wheel space station, and you jump, then you're no longer being accelerated by the rotation. What would happen? First, I'll establish some terms to make discussing ...
TheEnvironmentalist's user avatar
9 votes
2 answers
8k views

Is this the golf ball that Alan Shepard hit on the Moon?

The BBC News article The Five Greatest Space Hacks of All Time shows a photo of Alan Shepard on the Moon swinging an improvised golf club. Is the spot in the upper right corner of the photo a golf ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
7 votes
1 answer
367 views

How efficient would it be for an outpost to use human-powered vehicles?

Considering how bicycles use human power very efficiently for transport, would it be reasonable for astronauts on an outpost on the Moon or Mars to use easily replaceable human-powered equipment, like ...
Pedro Werneck's user avatar
7 votes
4 answers
915 views

Isometrics in zero gravity

Related question... Why don't astronauts do isometrics or timed static contractions against immovable objects (like fixed bars at different heights) to sustain muscle mass and bone density in zero, ...
Jagra's user avatar
  • 171
7 votes
1 answer
347 views

Exactly how does one lope on the Moon?

This answer includes several quotes from apollo astronauts that have walked on the moon. They describe a form of bipedal locomotion they call loping. Question: Exactly how does one lope on the Moon? ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
7 votes
1 answer
415 views

Any scholarly or serious work in Sports Science for the low surface gravity of Mars or the Moon?

One of my favorite answers in SXSE is this one which addresses subtler effects of low gravity on sports that one might not anticipate. There are other answers there, and other questions and answers ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
7 votes
1 answer
221 views

What would a human rocket be like to launch a human off Mimas?

In a comment on Is there a self-rounding celestial body from which an Olympian could jump into space? @jpa made a modest proposal. What if we stacked a bunch of athletes on top of each other and ...
Schwern's user avatar
  • 8,016
6 votes
5 answers
3k views

Drone Racing on moon

What kind of propulsion method are known to man that can be used for drone racing on moon land and sky(near surface) ? What role moon atmosphere might play?
Isrorian's user avatar
  • 569
6 votes
2 answers
672 views

Riding a bike on the moon

I noticed that some astronauts do things in space they always wanted to do - like Chris Hadfield playing the guitar on the ISS. I (like many other children ^^) wanted to become an astronaut pretty ...
publicdomain's user avatar
  • 1,222
6 votes
1 answer
398 views

With so little gravity, would swimming on Enceladus be feasible for humans?

I'm working on a science fiction piece set on Enceladus, and I'd like the characters (human) to do a fair amount of swimming (they've managed to terraform a small bit of ocean for themselves). However,...
adamholtwrites's user avatar
5 votes
5 answers
345 views

Are there any examples of a reduced-gravity sporting event or match being played in space?

I created the reduced-gravity-sports tag because I see it as both technically/scientifically interesting, and likely to be really big in the future. So now I'd like to ask: *Are there any examples ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
4 votes
1 answer
182 views

Why does the Smithsonian have a replica of Alan Shepard's golf club, and the real one is at a golf museum?

Alan Shepard famously hit two golf balls on the moon. He sneaked the modified head of a Wilson 6-iron golf club on board in a sock, and attached it to the handle of a lunar sample scoop. After ...
DrSheldon's user avatar
  • 48k
4 votes
1 answer
391 views

What if you tried to fly a kite on Mars?

I wonder what kite flying might be like on Mars, in one per cent the atmospheric pressure of Earth, about two per cent the Earth's atmospheric density and 38% the Earth's surface gravity. Are there ...
Giovanni's user avatar
  • 448
4 votes
1 answer
304 views

Why does Scott Manley say "the gravity of Europa is low enough that it's at the high end of what is possible in scuba with highly technical gear"?

Scott Manley's January 30, 2022 video Deep Space Radiation, Black Holes And Other Questions - Episode 14 discusses radiation levels and human survivability on Jovian satellites, and after ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
4 votes
1 answer
145 views

What benefits or new activities could take specific advantage of variable and/or low but not microgravity environment?

Just curious really. Considering that at some point in the future there might be rotational-based habitats, this would mean there would be easy access to variable gravity and/or low gravity ...
nirurin's user avatar
  • 459
4 votes
0 answers
107 views

Predictive simulation of gait on Mars?

In the Journal of Biomechanics, Volume 45, Issue 7, 30 April 2012, Pages 1293-1298, Predictive simulation of gait at low gravity reveals skipping as the preferred locomotion strategy (PDF file of an ...
Bob516's user avatar
  • 6,939
3 votes
2 answers
648 views

How many times would two astronauts have to run around Skylab to turn it by 10 arc minutes?

This answer to the question starts with: This video may help to answer your question. Starting at about 00:24, you can see an astronaut running around the "exercise wheel" of Skylab (an early NASA ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
3 votes
1 answer
274 views

What's the longest time that an astronaut remained in free fall?

After watching the video below (found here and here) I am reminded of the series of possibly less than 100% serious questions here about being weightless in the middle of a large volume and ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
3 votes
0 answers
43 views

How can normal sports be modified for playing in micro-gravity conditions? [closed]

What new equipment would we use to play sports such as football, basket ball, etc., in micro-gravity? What changes would we make to the games above? Also, are there any scholarly articles or proper ...
12345's user avatar
  • 31
3 votes
0 answers
277 views

Proposed methods to use electromagnetic force to replace gravity beyond boots?

I have been wondering if there have been any serious proposed methods to try to recover some functions of gravity with electromagnetic forces for astronauts in space. Fields generated in the floor of ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
2 votes
0 answers
552 views

Do astronauts play reduced gravity sports when folks on Earth aren't watching? Ever quasi-regularly? If so, what sports?

Astronauts on space stations routinely do things for their own entertainment and also things for public outreach/entertainment of folks on Earth. Videos below are examples. But I'm curious about any ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
2 votes
0 answers
790 views

Any published biophysics or sports physics research on how much top running speed might change on Mars or the Moon? (Indoors, not in a suit.)

Thanks for reopening!: How fast could a person run on the Moon? asks for users to make their own conclusions. Here I'm making a reference-request for research and results. Related but different: How ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
1 vote
3 answers
480 views

Why do we never see astronauts doing breaststroke or the "Man from Atlantis" swimming movements, say, and thus swimming in air in free fall?

Why do we never see astronauts and others swimming in air in free fall? The swimming strokes that work well under water on earth are the breast stroke and especially that "Man from Atlantis" ...
Matthew Christopher Bartsh's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
137 views

Zero-g astronaut motion

If I am an astronaut on a spacewalk in zero-g, and I reach out and hold onto a pole (sticking out from a large space station) on front of me (with the pole parallel to my head-to-feet axis), and then ...
Innovine's user avatar
  • 4,625
1 vote
0 answers
90 views

Indoor games played by Astronauts in Manned spacecrafts [closed]

What are the possible indoor games can be played by Astronauts on Spacecrafts as part of recreation? Playing cards, Chess, Table tennis, Scrabble etc. Since no gravity in space, there could be limited ...
Prashant Akerkar's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
194 views

Very Low Gravity Bicycle

There are a couple of existing questions about riding bicycles off of Earth. Designing a bicycle for Mars? Can you ride a bicycle on Deimos? Bicycles are lightweight and proved a reliable method ...
James Jenkins's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
603 views

Using a sling whirled around above the head, could someone on the moon throw a stone into orbit?

Similar to this question except not about using a machine: What payloads and launch speeds could a sling launcher get using modern materials on the Moon? How fast could a stone be thrown using a sling ...
Matthew Christopher Bartsh's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
173 views

What is the difference between "body drag", "frictional drag" and "pressure drag" for astronaut or aerobot atmospheric locomotion in microgravity?

Complaints below my answer to Would a higher air pressure on the ISS or elsewhere make it easier to “swim” in microgravity? about my spherical-cow estimate of how fast an astronaut can accelerate by &...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
0 votes
0 answers
117 views

Do penitentes predicted on Europa only apply to snow-covered areas and not bare ice?

This answer to What would ice-skating be like on Europa? cautions that it might be difficult because there may be penitentes which Wikipedia explains are snow formations. It links to EarthSky.org's ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k