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Questions tagged [russia]

The country of Russia is what remains of the former Soviet Union (Of which Russia was a province/state). The Russian/Soviet space program has been quite expansive and capable over many decades. Currently it appears to be suffering from lack of funding leading to quality control issues at times.

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How many nuclear fission reactors have been launched into space? How many are still there?

I remember p@Hobbes's answer to Which countries have built RTGs and used them in Earth orbit and/or beyond? mentioning that the US has put one nuclear fission reactor in space, and that not much was ...
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China, UAE and US all sending missions to Mars in 2020 (Summer of L̶o̶v̶e Mars); how far apart are their frequencies?

Gizmodo's Second failure of ExoMars parachute test throws schedule in jeopardy says: ExoMars 2020 is due to launch during a narrow window open between July 25th to August 13th 2020, during which ...
uhoh's user avatar
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5 answers
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Did Sputnik 1 tell us more than "beep"? What science was improved by information gained from its orbiting the Earth?

Sputnik 1 was the first artificial satellite launched by humans to orbit the Earth. This answer begins: Sputnik had just one single job: Prove its existence by sending a simple "beep" ...
uhoh's user avatar
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What are the parameters of the new Iodine electrical rocket engine developed by RSC Energia?

Several news outlets are reporting Energia Rocket and Space Corporation is nearing completion of a new electrical rocket engine using iodine stored as a solid and vaporized as needed. The new ...
SF.'s user avatar
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Why did Sputnik 1 have four antennas?

Sputnik was only launched a few hundred kilometers above Earth, and transmitted only a simple beeping signal. What was the purpose of having four antennas? Wouldn't one be powerful enough?
Elijah Seed Arita's user avatar
26 votes
4 answers
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Is there any advantage in launching spacecraft from a high latitude, or why was Plesetsk built so far north?

For launching satellites or other spacecraft, there is a significant advantage in being close to the equator: angular momentum helps in gaining initial speed and one can launch into any inclination. ...
gerrit's user avatar
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"Pillars of Baikonur" What is the purpose of the hundreds of short, white posts near the Baikonur Cosmodrome launch pad?

The caption given in the third image included in the Space.com page Expedition 56: The Space Station Mission in Photos reads as follows: At the Baikonur Cosmodrome launch pad, remote-controlled ...
uhoh's user avatar
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When/where did the cosmonauts fight wolves?

When/where did the cosmonauts fight wolves? or was it bears? With a gun? Could someone provide a more complete story? One of comments on the article TidalWave linked in the Soyuz joysticks question ...
SF.'s user avatar
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13 votes
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Is the Nudelman-Rikhter gun installed on Zvezda module?

By having a gun on board, one can conduct military kinds of experiments. Exploring armoring approaches for spacecraft, warning systems for the personnel, orbital ballistic studies for the multi-body ...
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How did Alexey Leonov bleed off the pressure in his space suit?

On the Voskhod 2 mission, cosmonaut Alexey Leonov performed a spacewalk which ran into issues when Lenov's spacesuit had some sort of pressure buildup. From the wiki - [Leonov] was forced to bleed ...
David says Reinstate Monica's user avatar
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How many leaks have been fixed on the ISS, roughly?

Leaks come in all sizes. Very small ones might be ignored or remain undetected, slightly faster ones might be identified and dispositioned; if they are slow and going to remain stable, they might not ...
uhoh's user avatar
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Is this window zenith-facing? (ISS docked Soyuz) If so, how directly?

Pursuant to the question Does the ISS have zenith-facing windows? to which the conclusion (in my opinion) is that there may be a window that provides an oblique view that might include the zenith if ...
uhoh's user avatar
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Is potable water in the American & Russian segments still stored separately?

This article writes to say An interesting fact is that the Russian and American segment water supplies can’t be mixed. The U.S. water uses iodine for bacteria control, while the Russian water uses ...
Everyone's user avatar
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Early high-inclination crewed flights

I noticed to my surprise today that the very early Soviet flights were to a very high inclination - all the Vostok flights were between 64.9° and 65°, and the Voskhod flights were at 64.7° and 64.8°. ...
Andrew is gone's user avatar
14 votes
2 answers
1k views

How do items from the Russian and Soviet space programs end up in private collections?

A member today posted this photo showing a complete instrument panel from a Soyuz TM capsule, and a globus instrument from a Voskhod capsule: Both items are in their private collection. Only 5 ...
kim holder's user avatar
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Russian "kerosene" versus American "RP-1"

RP-1 rocket fuel is a "highly refined form of kerosene". Most of the literature I have seen refers to Russian rockets using kerosene, versus American rockets using RP-1 (*1). Is there really such a ...
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3 answers
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How did Lunokhod 1 become "lost" in 1971; in what ways did astronomers "look for it" after that?

The Smithsonian Magazine article Lost Soviet Reflector Found on the Moon says: There are actually five retroreflectors on the Moon: three placed by Apollo astronauts and two that sit atop Soviet ...
uhoh's user avatar
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What happens differently when ISS is inside this red boundary (Russia & Europe & ...)?

The question Why are there advertisements in the Russian ISS flight control room? shows the image below. There is a large red boundary that looks like the boundary of the overlap of several circles ...
uhoh's user avatar
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10 votes
1 answer
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Is this a photo of today's Soyuz anomaly happening in flight seen from the ISS? What are the little dots?

ISS Exp. 57 Cmdr. and ESA Astronaut Alexander Gerst's Tweet today says: Glad our friends are fine. Thanks to the rescue force of >1000 SAR professionals! Today showed again what an amazing vehicle ...
uhoh's user avatar
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0 answers
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Why will Russia start arming cosmonauts again?

The Phys.org article Russia to give cosmonauts guns to fend off animals on landing says: Cosmonauts have been unarmed for more than a decade but Roscosmos agency head Dmitry Rogozin said it was time ...
uhoh's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
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How is Spektr-R doing these days?

Under the question What are Spectr-R's major contributions to radio astronomy that could not have been done from Earth? there is a new comment that points (again) to the BBC News article Spektr-R: ...
uhoh's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
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How exactly did ground stations track the early Molniya satellites?

Wikipedia's Orbita (TV system) says: Orbita (Russian: орбита) is a Soviet-Russian system of broadcasting and delivering TV signals via satellites. It is considered to be the first national network of ...
uhoh's user avatar
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50 votes
1 answer
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How did the Russians get moon rocks?

I've read somewhere that the Russians have moon rocks. How did they get them?
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18 votes
1 answer
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Why is the Russian approach to the aerodynamics of their rockets different?

Russian rockets look like this: They flare them out at the bottom. With their newest rocket, the Proton, the flared shape is gone but the boosters still have caps that angle in towards the main ...
kim holder's user avatar
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16 votes
1 answer
872 views

Why are there advertisements in the Russian ISS flight control room?

I found a photograph of the Russian ISS flight control room: Source: NASA https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Russian_ISS_Flight_Control_Room.jpg Below the large screen are several ...
Flux's user avatar
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16 votes
2 answers
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Why are checklists the way they are?

Checklists from different programs are quite different, they are also different from typical aviation checklists. The ISS checklists are full of special characters, e.g. √, boxes around numbers, some ...
yeg's user avatar
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15 votes
1 answer
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Do American astronauts wear Sokol space suits when flying on a Soyuz?

The Wikipedia article on the Sokol space suit seems to suggest that all personel traveling on a Soyuz vehicle must wear a Russian made spacesuit: Each Soyuz crew member is provided with a made-to-...
user avatar
12 votes
2 answers
988 views

Are the Russians planning to replace the Baikonur Cosmodrome?

For decades, the Baikonur Cosmodrome was the premier Soviet space launch site. Many historic launches took place there, and it earned its place in the history books. But then the Soviet Union fell ...
HDE 226868's user avatar
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12 votes
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Are any of these Soyuz controls involved in separating the orbital module?

According to this Q & A, it's very likely that the Soyuz spacecraft's orbital module can be manually separated independent of other spacecraft operations. On this CollectSpace page, there's an ...
Russell Borogove's user avatar
12 votes
1 answer
963 views

Did early Russian capsules really have "Human Inside" labels?

This comic claims that it was to prevent people panicking and attacking the crew. However, Vostok pilots were supposed to land separately from the capsule. Are there any photos supporting this claim? ...
Neith's user avatar
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11 votes
2 answers
485 views

Does Russia still manufacture parts for their space program that would otherwise be obsolete?

The Russian space program is notable for continuing to use the same designs that have been successful for decades. For example, the Soyuz boosters and Soyuz crew vehicles in use today are still the ...
DrSheldon's user avatar
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10 votes
1 answer
569 views

How close to a building has a Soyuz landed?

Soyuz capsules are designed to land onto land. To avoid the small chance of harming people or property, they are usually targeted to land in remote parts of Kazakhstan. However, some landings aren't ...
DrSheldon's user avatar
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8 votes
4 answers
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Russian manned Moon landing capability today

Do Russians have means of launching a manned mission to the Moon? Do they have an engine with sufficient thrust and stability needed (RD-170 has bigger thrust than the F-1 engine, if I read the data ...
mark.g's user avatar
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8 votes
2 answers
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What does the abbreviation "MS" for the current Soyuz version name mean?

A quick search the meaning of the abbreviations for the previous versions of the Soyuz spacecraft easily tells me their meaning: Soyuz T. 'T' is for транспортный, ...
SE - stop firing the good guys's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
1k views

How did the Luna spacecraft collect samples of the moon and containerize them for return to Earth?

The Wikipedia page Sample-return mission and this answer list Luna 16, 20 and 24 missions as each bringing back of the order of 100 grams of lunar material to Earth, but their Wikipedia pages don't ...
uhoh's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
582 views

What does Zvezda alone lack from being a capable space station?

A recent discussion on the ISS has raised some questions in my mind about Zvezda: Can the US Part of ISS survive independent of the Russian? What does Zvezda alone lack from being a capable space ...
called2voyage's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
518 views

How will the RD-180 ban affect US space program?

RD-180 is a rocket engine produced by Russian NPO Energomash company. It is used in such US rockets as Atlas III and Atlas V. There are rumors, that Russia is considering to ban RD-180 export to US. ...
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6 votes
0 answers
2k views

Why exactly did Khrushchev present Pushinka to JFK's daughter Caroline?

Pushinka (Fluffy) was the name of one of the Strelka's (Arrow's) six pups that she had after being safely landed to Earth from orbit to which it was launched aboard Vostok-1K rocket No. 2 on 19 August ...
TildalWave's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
10k views

What is the flyaway cost of a Soyuz and Proton Rocket?

The obvious wikipedia articles... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_orbital_launch_systems http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_orbital_launchers_families ...don't have this info. I'm ...
DrZ214's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
455 views

Who transliterates non-Russian names into Russian for space-suit name tags?

Many, many astronauts have gone on to be wonderful orators, educators, advocates for science, education and positive thinking, Major Tom Colonel (ret) and (fmr) ISS Commander Chris Hadfield is just ...
uhoh's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
578 views

Did Buran also copy the Canadarm?

Considering that the Soviets copied practically everything else on the Space Shuttle, did they also make their own version of the Canadarm robotic arm?
DrSheldon's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
371 views

Was the teletype machine on MIR the first printer in space? Is there a photo, and what frequencies were used?

Seeing the video KK5IM 2021 Shack Tour spotted in The Ham Shack lead me to What paper size do they use on the International Space Station? which begins: We know they have at least one printer on the ...
uhoh's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
780 views

Who designed the cool-looking Orbita Molniya tracking station at Khabarovsk? What does it look like inside?

Wikipedia's Orbita (TV system) says: Orbita (Russian: орбита) is a Soviet-Russian system of broadcasting and delivering TV signals via satellites. It is considered to be the first national network of ...
uhoh's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
123 views

Do space stations have standardized officer designations for crew?

I have some anecdotal information. The ISS has a commander, and I noticed here that it had a Flight Engineer, and in this article (found here) I see that Skylab had a Science Pilot. Do space stations ...
uhoh's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
12k views

What size and shape is an SL-16 R/B and for how long will they orbit Earth?

This night I've seen two SL-16 R/B on the sky with my binoculars. These where part of some Zenit rockets that launched satellites in the 90s. They travel at altitudes that double the ISS, uncontrolled....
Swike's user avatar
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2 votes
3 answers
4k views

Why are Molniya orbits peculiar?

Molniya orbits are always associated with Russian satellites. What advantage do they have over other orbits?
Nnadi ugwumsinachi steinacoz's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
175 views

What device did Oleg Novitsky insert into the hatch of the Nauka module before opening it? How does it work? When did it arrive to the ISS? [duplicate]

The Roscosmos Media video Первое видео из модуля «Наука» (google translates to: "The first video from the module "Science" (Nauka)) shows Roscosmos cosmonauts Oleg Novitsky and Pyotr ...
uhoh's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
122 views

Roscosmos: Government agency, state-owned corporation, or something else?

Exactly what kind of organization is Roscosmos? An agency of the government, like NASA? We seem to treat it as such in this site. A state-owned corporation, like the old Soviet design bureaus? The ...
DrSheldon's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
519 views

What is the basis of the new Russian nuclear rocket propulsion?

The New York Times' Russia Confirms Radioactive Materials Were Involved in Deadly Blast discusses the potential nuclear aspects of the recent missile test and references several time the possibility ...
uhoh's user avatar
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