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An airplane at the altitude of the Kármán line can't ignore the centrifugal force

Why not consider the Kármán line as a curved boundary that follows the curvature of the Earth ?

According to Wikipedia's article about the Kármán line:

The Kármán line is the altitude where the speed necessary to aerodynamically support the airplane's full weight equals orbital velocity ( assuming wing loading of a typical airplane )………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...The Kármán line is therefore the highest altitude at which orbital speed provides sufficient aerodynamic lift to fly in a straight line that doesn't follow the curvature of the Earth's surface.

But the FAI(Fédération Aéronautiqe Internationale) that adopted the definition, doesn't mention any straight line in this article about the 100km altitude boundary for astronautics

So could not the definition of the Kármán line be better explained by an airplane in orbit around the Earth, rather than by an airplane flying in a straight line ?

And what are the necessary calculations to do so ?

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