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The speed needed to "break free" of the gravitational attraction of a body without spending more propellant.

6
votes
Here is an example of going to deep space without orbiting the Earth once. As can be heard in this video SpaceX's launch of the DSCOVR spacecraft to Sun-Earth L1 went there almost directly. The first …
answered Jan 18 '18 by uhoh
4
votes
I've assumed a meta-Falcon 9 Full Thrust and shot it straight up on a non-rotating Earth with no atmosphere. 1st stage 2nd stage coast stage …
answered Jun 21 '18 by uhoh
2
votes
The electromagnet would work if you were still far away enough that you could overcome the force, but you'd probably want to cool superconducting coils sufficiently and insulate them from incident rad …
answered May 21 '16 by uhoh
1
vote
tl;dr: For a trip from Earth to Mars, I get a velocity 1% greater than $v_{\infty}$ at point about 70% to the way to the Earth's SOI. The question is about departing a planet and proceeding to inte …
answered Sep 20 '17 by uhoh
15
votes
As @Rikki-Tikki-Tavi points out escape velocity is the velocity you would need at (or near) the surface of Earth to make out out of Earth orbit. Of course, just like anything thrown up into the air, t …
answered Jun 10 '18 by uhoh
4
votes
note: I've accepted an answer 2.5 years ago. This paper was published recently so I thought I would add this supplemental answer since it may be an interesting reference for future readers. The Spa …
answered Apr 24 '18 by uhoh
21
votes
tl;dr: No chance, not even close! The escape velocity from the surface of a round (spherically symmetric) body is given by $$v_{esc} = \sqrt{\left(\frac{2 GM}{r_0} \right)}, $$ showing that it is …
answered Oct 31 '18 by uhoh