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Results tagged with Search options user 127

Questions regarding the mechanics or attributes of objects falling 'around' other objects, thereby orbiting them.

18
votes
Starting liquid-fueled rocket engines in zero-g conditions is a non-trivial problem that should be explicitly addressed during design. There are a number of common approaches: Use an auxiliary propu …
answered Oct 20 '13 by Adam Wuerl
8
votes
I believe the two bodies could be orbiting a central bodies at the stable Lagrange points. Planet A would be at Planet B's L4 Lagrange point, and Planet B would be at Planet A's L5 point. from Wiki …
answered Oct 3 '15 by Adam Wuerl
1
vote
The orbital period of a satellite is solely determined by the semi-major axis of its orbit and the body it’s orbiting, specifically: $$T = 2\pi \sqrt{a^3/\mu}$$ Where $\mu$ is the gravitational … constant of the body being orbited. For Earth, $\mu$ = 5.166 $km^3/hr^2$ (we neglect the mass of the satellite because the Earth weights about 1 hellagram), and $a$ is the semi-major axis of the orbit
answered Apr 3 '15 by Adam Wuerl
11
votes
25-year on-orbit requirement will be met. As of 2008, this includes what's known as a conjunction analysis, which looks at the probability of the new spacecraft intersecting old ones. So the short … answer is that slots are not assigned, but (at least in the US) analysis is required to show the spacecraft has a low probability of hitting something already in orbit. Unfortunately in practice …
answered Jun 28 '14 by Adam Wuerl