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Questions regarding the process of bringing a mission to an early stop, often due to an emergency or unforeseen circumstances.

9
votes
I suspect these two abort situations test two different things, and as such have different requirements. As you mentioned, the Florida SpaceX launch schedule is quite busy, and I suspect they want to … minimize the downtime there as much as possible. I suspect the pad abort test has to be done at Flordia, however, due to the unique communication lines and such at the Florida site. The Max Q abort
answered Aug 12 '14 by PearsonArtPhoto
2
votes
The scenario for an abort with the Dragon V2 requires the use of the Super Draco pods to get far enough away from the rocket to prevent damage, following the use of parachutes to safely land. The … parachutes are only used in an abort (Or otherwise atypical landing), as it takes longer to re-certify the parachutes after a landing than the rockets. The rockets are either used as an abort mechanism …
answered Aug 4 '15 by PearsonArtPhoto
7
votes
Hypothetically speaking, let's assume the boosters could have somehow detached at T+74s, and had no impact the shuttle. Let's also assume there is no leaking fuel somehow. The acceleration at T+74s …
answered Jul 18 '18 by PearsonArtPhoto
15
votes
It seems the most likely reason is that at T-10 seconds, anything that is a serious enough issue to abort should be caught by the computer, and aborting mid-stream could cause larger issues. Take a … . The automatic aborts have been tested, in fact, this is at least the second Falcon rocket to abort automatically right before launch. A manual abort would need to be tested further along in the …
answered Nov 29 '13 by PearsonArtPhoto