The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options answers only user 897

Questions regarding special words and abbreviations used in space exploration, and their meaning in that context.

3
votes
Perigee would be the closest, but that may be abusing the term. Perigee means "closest to Earth", but generally it's used for objects that are in Earth's orbit.
answered Jul 17 '15 by Hobbes
13
votes
Edit: Thinking about this some more, the answer is a result of physics: gases exert pressure (due to molecules bumping into each other). This is what causes a gas to expand to occupy all available vo …
answered Nov 15 '14 by Hobbes
2
votes
They're talking about the Helium tanks (COPV, composite overwrapped pressure vessels). For the smaller Falcon 9 COPVs, SpaceX will take immediate corrective actions including changing the COPV co …
answered Feb 21 by Hobbes
2
votes
The term is ambiguous. A slingshot is also a shot from a sling.
answered Sep 3 '16 by Hobbes
4
votes
Their name seems to be "Motorized Bolt Assembly", this is what they look like: The servo is in the rectangular box marked BMA, the bolt extends through the fine guide cone. More about the BMA (P …
answered Apr 27 '16 by Hobbes
2
votes
From Wikipedia: Many private space travelers have objected to the term "space tourist", often pointing out that their role went beyond that of an observer, since they also carried out scientific …
answered Mar 12 '17 by Hobbes
1
vote
Molniya is called semisynchronous because it can work as a sort-of geosynchronous satellite for part of its orbit, not because its period is 12h. I've never seen specific names for orbits other than …
answered Sep 4 '16 by Hobbes
6
votes
No, it's not redundant. The abbreviation GEO expands to Geosynchronous Equatorial Orbit. A geosynchronous orbit that coincided with the Earth's equatorial plane would then also be geostationary.
answered Apr 1 by Hobbes
8
votes
Boosters were in use by 21 August 1957, the first successful suborbital launch of the R-7. Definition of 'booster': A booster rocket (or engine) is either the first stage of a multistage launch …
answered Mar 18 by Hobbes
5
votes
A cryogenic geyser occurs when a volume of cryogenic liquid inside e.g. a pipe suddenly boils, propelling the liquid/gas mixture through the pipe and into its destination at high speed. The pipe ca …
answered Oct 18 '16 by Hobbes
8
votes
The words perigee and apogee (and their planet-specific equivalents) show it's impractical to use planet-specific names for everything. The solar system alone has far too many objects to make this pra …
answered Nov 27 '18 by Hobbes
0
votes
When you speak English, use the term English astronaut. Using the Russian word 'cosmonaut' as an honorific was a nice idea when there were only 2 nations with manned space programs, but is becoming un …
answered Dec 18 '15 by Hobbes
3
votes
GLOM = Gross Lift-Off Mass. This is The overall weight of a spacecraft at lift-off, including the main rocket, boosters, propellant, and payload.
answered Jun 5 by Hobbes
1
vote
What you might be seeing here is language being made. When scientists start studying a new field, they sometimes have to invent words to describe what they see. Here, two sets of scientists independen …
answered Jun 4 '18 by Hobbes
3
votes
During the Apollo moon landings, the astronauts referred to 'forward' and 'down' for the red and green vectors. In the Gemini 12 voice comms transcript (page 29 of a 500-page PDF), a maneuver is refer …
answered Feb 10 '14 by Hobbes