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Results tagged with Search options user 897

Space Exploration Technologies Corporation, or SpaceX, is a private space exploration company. It was the world's first privately held company to successfully launch a cargo mission into space.

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SpaceX uses both. In the landing videos, you can see the center main engine gimbaling to rather large angles during the final approach. In the initial landing attempts, they found that the …
answered Feb 15 '17 by Hobbes
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In 2014, 2 years after that interview took place, SpaceX still got aluminium-lithium alloys from Alcoa. But they also have another supplier, Constellium: SpaceX has since developed a heavy … made from our AIRWARE® 2195 and 2219 alloys to the barrel sections. The domes are manufactured by spin forming. So it appears SpaceX found another supplier for the material for the tank domes. …
answered Aug 24 '16 by Hobbes
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Musk did not start SpaceX to create wealth. He did it because he wanted to colonize Mars. Initially, Musk tried to buy a launch from a Russian provider to land a greenhouse on Mars. Musk: In … Saturdays I had them do a feasibility study about building rockets more efficiently. It became clear that there wasn’t anything to prevent us from doing it. Musk took a big risk starting SpaceX. After 3 …
answered Oct 16 '18 by Hobbes
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back. If there's less fuel left, they can land on a barge in the ocean. This takes less fuel than flying back. SpaceX prefers to land the stage on land (recovery is easier, no ships needed …
answered Feb 19 '17 by Hobbes
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The mechanism is a pneumatic cylinder. The cylinder is actuated by a bottle of high-pressure helium.
answered Jan 18 '16 by Hobbes
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Steel has been used, for example for the Atlas and Centaur, and for the Shuttle SRBs. Most rockets switched to aluminium because it's lighter and because the rocket was expendable and didn't need to s …
answered Jan 27 by Hobbes
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They're talking about the Helium tanks (COPV, composite overwrapped pressure vessels). For the smaller Falcon 9 COPVs, SpaceX will take immediate corrective actions including changing the COPV … , SpaceX said it will implement COPV design changes to prevent buckles altogether while enabling faster loading operations.​ …
answered Feb 21 by Hobbes
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Without knowing how SpaceX arrived at the 3.66 m diameter, this has to be speculation. Most rockets have a lower fineness ratio than the F9v1.2 (i.e. they're fatter). That makes it likely there's …
answered May 27 '17 by Hobbes
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At the 2010 AIAA Joint Propulsion conference, SpaceX presented potential designs for future heavy and super-heavy lift vehicles. These presented designs were no firmed up configurations of future … launchers, and merely represented conceptual ideas, however, it is likely that SpaceX would take a path similar to the presented designs for their future launch vehicles. The plan was to start with …
answered Apr 12 by Hobbes
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This image has a better view of the top of the engine: The quadrapod structure is attached rigidly to the rocket. At the bottom of the quadrapod there's a gimbal joint. The exact structure of th …
answered May 21 '17 by Hobbes
35
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Normal hydraulic systems are closed. When hydraulic fluid is squeezed out of a cylinder, it returns to a holding tank ready to be pressurized again by the pump. SpaceX have confirmed the Falcon 9 …
answered Jan 11 '15 by Hobbes
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NASA does not just 'trust' its suppliers. It audits them to make sure the supplier can deliver what it claims. The contracts for commercial cargo and crew flights were built around milestones where th …
answered Aug 24 '16 by Hobbes
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Because this will be the first Falcon Heavy launch, they did a fit check: basically they ran through the process of moving the rocket to the launch pad and erecting it, to see if everything works as d …
answered Jan 2 '18 by Hobbes
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Practical roadblocks to getting a payload that small into orbit: IIRC nobody offers this service for random small objects. The space industry has more or less standardized on the cubesat standard, …
answered Jul 22 '18 by Hobbes
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You'd have to get very lucky. Bullets would punch small holes in the RP-1 and LOX tanks and you'd have small streams of both flowing out. If the bullet were to hit one of the high-pressure tanks, ho …
answered Sep 2 '16 by Hobbes

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