20

It's the third in a series. Planet-A, "Suiseu" studied Halley's comet. Planet-B, "Nozomi" visited Mars. Looks like there's a Planet-D (PDF link) planned for visiting Venus, too.


10

An ISAS mission in development is known by a series and a letter. After successful launch, it gets a name, based on suggestions from its developers. One I worked on, ASTRO-E, unsuccessfully launched, was rebuilt as ASTRO-E2. Once successfully launched, it was named "Suzaku", after a mythical bird that is reborn in some stories.


9

They will use the attitude control engines instead of the main engine. JAXA decided to carry out orbit control of the AKATSUKI using its liquid-fuel thrusters for altitude control (or the reaction control subsystem, RCS.) Based on this decision, almost all of the unnecessary oxidizer was discarded in Oct. 2011. As a result, the satellite became lighter, ...


6

The density of carbon dioxide on Venus varies from about 67 kg/m3 at the surface to about 52 kg/m3 at a height of about 5 km, calculated with this software tool Image from Solar Powered Flight on Venus According to the graph above and Appendix A from the article the wind speed on Venus varies from 0.6 m/sec at the surface to 1.2 m/sec at a height of 5 km. ...


5

Partial answer addressing why would salt deposits cause the engines to run oxidizer-rich? The propulsion system is shown in this drawing. At top is a helium pressurant tank, at left is the fuel tank, at right is the oxidizer tank. The "salt" deposits partially clogged the check valve CV-F restricting the flow of helium to pressurize the fuel tank. The ...


4

Without its main thruster, orbit maneuver engine (OME), that's been completely dismissed as possible to restart (they did try but only got a small fraction of thrust out of it, about 10%) and have even dumped oxidizer (Mixed Oxides of Nitrogen, or MON) to save on spacecraft's mass as reaction control system (RCS) thrusters don't need it, extremely low (300 ...


3

I think it does not have the ability to detect it. What was observed (or may not have been observed now) was a rotational transition at $267\,\mathrm{GHz}$ or about $1.123\,\mathrm{mm}$. Akatsuki's instruments are all in or around the visible spectrum: it has instruments which work from $\sim 250\,\mathrm{nm}$ to $\sim 10\,\mathrm{\mu m}$ I think, probably ...


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