72

The signal from the Moon was received using giant parabolic antennas, e.g. the 64-m dish at the Parkes observatory. These have very good sidelobe rejection so they won't pick up any Earthbound signals. Despite the space race, relations with their biggest enemy were good enough that the Russians shared Luna 15's flight plan with the Americans when this ...


48

It isn't really feasible to launch your own rocket, unless you have a lot of money to spend. The required power is immense. Hitting sub-orbital might be possible, and has been done once by amateurs, but they received sponsorships and had a team dedicated to making it happen. The trick to an orbital rocket is not just to get high, but also fast. The speed ...


46

Astronautical engineer here, welcome to the small satellite community! Firstly, it's important to recognize that the FCC tightly regulates the radio spectra available to satellites and amateur broadcasters, so before even considering how to launch your spacecraft, you should make sure your payload is legal. The FCC tables on frequency allocations can be ...


24

The difference between 10 W at 350,000km, and 1,000 W at 1km is 131 dB. If the pranksters on Earth used a directional antenna like the Ham radio operators shown below, the ratio would be even higher because that thing has much more gain than the Apollo antennas from the orbit and surface of the Moon. It would only take a tiny bit of random or isotropic ...


12

The Space Shuttle retired in 2011, and no amateur launch has ever reached orbit, but there are plenty of opportunities to piggyback on commercial and government launch services. Mostly this is arranged through a broker, for example Spaceflight Industries. A rough order of magnitude estimate for price would be US$50,000 / kg.


11

A TV show addressed this some years ago. What appears to be the full video on You-tube: (Link gone--tv show "How Hard Can It Be", Episode 3 -- "Homemade Rocket".) Owner's website with a few minutes of video: https://www.natgeotv.com/ca/how-hard-can-it-be/videos This was a TV production, they obviously have a budget well above what most ...


6

There is an international organisation of amateur radio societies from the ISS partner countries with a volunteer working group devoted to developing and putting into operation the ISS amateur radio station, and they go by the name ARISS (Amateur Radio on the International Space Station). The ARISS program is a cooperative venture of NASA, the ARRL and ...


5

It's probably good to bring up Copenhagen Suborbital up as a reference here. They're quite possibly the most competent amateur rocketeers, yet their name already points out that they're not aiming for orbit. In general, the challenge point for amateurs currently is the Karman line, 100 km up and the official start of space, but that is a whole lot easier ...


5

So, let's first compare the distances. Your average LEO satellite is placed in orbit maybe 600 km. The distance to the moon is 384000 km. That is 640 times further. Using $r^2$ losses, and converting to decibels, that is an additional 56 dB loss. Of course, a groundstation needs to be able to communicate in LEO beyond directly overhead, so let's just assume ...


5

Oscar-7's designed lifetime was three years. But it did work from 1974 to 1981 (in its first period), about the double designed lifetime. Oscar-7 was reliably used by the amateur radio community all over the world from just after launch until June 1981 when its batteries likely shorted. This in turn short-circuited the entire power system, just like ...


5

This happened on the first Spacelab flight, STS-9. For the 1983 ham radio contact mentioned above, what wavelength... All ham radio operation for STS-9 will be in the Amateur Radio 2-meter band (144-148 MHz), Dr. Garriott's transceiver will have the capacity to transmit and receive on channels 20-kHz apart. The planned operating frequency range is: Space-to-...


4

I assume most of these balloon flights follow the proper regulations, and thus are legal, and in theory safe. There are a number of regulations, which this site includes, including weight limits, not dropping objects, and limiting the weight/surface area ratio, to keep the terminal velocity low. There are also quite a few regarding communication, but I'll ...


4

They are in fact in deep space, but there were all carried there by some other mission already heading to deep space as a secondary payload. They were all university payloads, thus operating on the amateur radio frequencies, but not of particular use to more amateur operators. For reference, one of the easiest ways to tell an amateur satellite is to look ...


3

Here is a post on how to receive from geostationary orbit (GEO) weather satellites like GOES: https://www.rtl-sdr.com/setting-up-a-goes-weather-satellite-antenna-system/ You may also want to check this: https://www.wmo-sat.info/oscar/satellitefrequencies It lists satellite frequencies and their related services. As far as I know, APT, AHRPT and LRPT should ...


3

There is an excellent article about Cosmos 2499 that explains some of the history of the satellite. One of the things in particular is the following: According to Ostapenko, the satellites were developed in cooperation between Roskosmos and the Russian Academy of Sciences and were used for peaceful purposes including unspecified research by educational ...


3

Not really amateur, but CubeSats for sure. AeroCube 7 / OCSD would have already tested it, but had attitude control problems. Should relaunch in a few months. One can find plenty of detailed publications too. ArgoMoon will be one of the next. Testing it from beyond Moon orbit, but not much is known yet. Edit 2018-12-08: AeroCube-7B successfully ...


3

There was one that I can find, a beacon that used infrared light to communicate at a rate or 400 bits/second, on AO-40, which was a technology demonstration mission by AMSAT. Wikipedia doesn't include any amateur missions. It is proposed to use laser based communication for satellites beyond Earth's orbit, such as the ...


3

The event web-site you posted shows theground-track, and a list of cities to orient a directional antenna . This site also writes to say See Juno’s current position, speed and more via NASA’s Eyes on the Solar System 3D interactive. Launch the Juno module or view Juno in the standard Eyes on the Solar System interface. Hope this helps! I'm QRU ...


3

How do you stop people acting irresponsibly? I have no idea. I don't think anyone has. They have been main antagonists of our nightmares ever since we started dreaming. Why am I saying this? Because you're absolutely right and the Toy Train in Space was let from a densely populated area, possibly without notifying and gaining permission from airspace ...


3

Yes, it's being researched. For instance, this JPL paper describes a design for a parabolic antenna with a diameter of 50 cm that can be folded and stowed in 1.5 U, and provides a gain of 42 dB. Another approach is the reflectarray, an antenna that uses a flat panel instead of a dish, with structures on the panel that look like a Fresnel lens to focus the ...


2

It seems like the best thing that can be done for this is to look at the times they have in the past, and try to be on at the same time. Bottom line, you just have to keep trying, and hopefully some day you'll get lucky. But they don't publish schedules ahead of time, just after the fact.


2

I really, really hate saying this, but I'm afraid not. My reasoning? I, and probably many others, have been Googling like crazy to find the answer to this for three weeks. If there were a pre-published time, then one would think that it would come up as one of the first results for a search like iss ham radio contact or iss ham radio time. I'm very eager ...


2

I think that Earth - Moon communications with a CubeSat in lunar orbit are feasible, even though it would require a lot of effort. Closing the link is a trade off between operational frequency, the available power on the satellite, and the volume on the satellite available for the antenna (the higher the frequency, the higher the path losses, the smaller ...


2

The answer is no they are not Ham Radio Satellites, but they are amateur built satellites. These satellites are indeed in deep space, however I would like to point out that there is a difference between 'amateur satellites' and 'amateur radio satellites.' I call them 'amsats' and 'hamsats' respectively. Amsats are built by amateurs, ie non-commercial, non-...


2

Since 1961, there have been a series of satellites called OSCAR, for Orbiting Satellite Carrying Amateur Radio. These have generally been launched when some other space mission has excess lifting capacity. As far as I know, if you are going to launch something into space which will transmit radio, you need to get the approval of appropriate government ...


2

G. Ericsson could potentially get a cube satellite into Low Earth Orbit for under $100,000.00. Vector is a nano-satellite launch company creating rockets targeted towards launching small payloads into Low Earth Orbit (LEO). They are taking reservations to reserve space on five orbital launch rockets between 2019 and 2023 on the Vector-R launch vehicle. They ...


2

Obligatory XKCD What If. Getting to orbit is not a a problem of just vertical distance. You also need to go really fast to stay in orbit (I assume you want your satellite to stay up there). First, you have to go up about 100 KM, then you need to reach a speed of 8 km/s to stay in orbit. That's going to require a massive rocket. Randal compared the ...


2

A few issues here: You don't "pull" information with a radio. That just isn't a thing. When transmitting, radio waves follow an inverse square law: when you double the distance, you quarter the power, which means you rapidly approach the noise floor (from cosmic radiation, solar radiation, you name it) so in order to combat noise, you need to send data ...


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