25

This is explained in the Apollo Program Summary Report. A floating command module has two stable positions; stable II is upside-down and undesired. It was discovered that three identical uprighting bags was not enough to get out of the stable II position, so the Z-axis bag was made smaller: 4.4.4.4 Uprighting system [...] In addition to the overall weight ...


21

The first Block I version of the capsule used three bags of the same diameter (43 inch). The later Block II used one smaller bag (34 inch). The volume of the small bag was 49.43 % of the larger ones. So they wanted to try a smaller bag with half the volume and calculated a 34 inch diameter bag. Source: https://airborne-sys.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/...


16

The live broadcasts from the Moon were not recorded on the LEM/CM. Video tape recorders were too large at the time to make this practical. They usually came in the shape of an open-reel tape recorder with 2" wide tape. This is the Ampex VR-660, a "portable" VTR that weighed 50 kg: NASA used the VR-660 at ground stations to store slow-scan video. The ...


10

Some Apollo Lunar Sample Rock Containers (ALSRC) have been to the Moon twice according to the Catalog of Apollo Lunar Surface Geological Sampling Tools and Containers: Serial number 1006: Apollo 14 and Apollo 17 Serial number 1007: Apollo 14 and Apollo 17 Serial number 1009: Apollo 12 and Apollo 16 I didn't spot other items being re-used; for example, the ...


9

As a data point (but as yet, not a complete answer in itself) I came across this paper whilst reading up on satellite antennae for another question: Lunar Far Side Communication Satellites, dated June 1968. It is a NASA technical report, for whatever that's worth. It considered several tasks: relaying signals from a lunar module landed on the far side of ...


7

Partial answer posted as a community wiki: The dead mouse was a male, numbered A-3352. The most complete account of the Apollo 17 pocket mouse experiment is provided in Biomedical Results of Apollo (pdf, html). A table in figure 7 specifies some vital statistics of the five flown mice: Weight (g) Food left Number start end start end Notes /...


7

Hobbes' answer is correct, but here is some supplemental information. The Erectable S-Band Antenna was a parabolic dish that was folded and stowed in the descent stage. Page 4-86 of the Apollo Program Summary Report describes the diameter as 10 feet and this NASA webpage says 3 meters. It was carried on Apollo 11-14. Although the LM could broadcast with ...


7

I am not 100% confident in this answer. But I think it is the power supply for the flashing beacon light. The flashing beacon light itself is indicated in this crop of the picture from the question. From this diagram extracted from the News Reference Manual the beacon power supply / battery box is in the right place. But the drawing is not clear.


7

According to his bio for the Heartland Institute: Dr. Schmitt was selected as a scientist-astronaut by NASA in June 1965. He later completed a 53-week course in flight training at Williams Air Force Base, Arizona. So I believe that year of flight training did yield a military certification.


5

The Apollo 16 Mission Report, section 9.8.2 explains First extravehicular activity.- Following the first sleep period and normal preparation for surface activities, the Commander egressed slightly ahead of schedule. Because of the steerable antenna failure, there was no television coverage of the Commander stepping onto the lunar surface. According to ...


5

For Apollo 16, there should be. Start of EVA-1: 119:02:43 Duke: Okay. (Long Pause) [Charlie turns the 16-mm movie camera on and we see the left side of John's suit as he makes his way down the ladder. The jett bag is lying on the ground at the north edge of the LM shadow.] (emphasis mine)


5

There isn't much documentation on the design or evolution of the LM floor. There are holes where dust could plausibly be swept into, but it's not clear whether they were designed for that purpose. The Apollo 17 Mission Report, p. 10-15 calls them "holes": Prior to ascent from the lunar surface, the cabin activities included covering all holes in the ...


4

It's subjective. There are ways to claim that Apollo 17 had the most success, but there are also ways to claim that Apollo 15 was more successful. The cited text below are from the official NASA webpages for the objectives of each Apollo mission. These were the most detailed listing of Apollo objectives that I could find. I have only cited the scientific ...


4

According to the FAA Airman Search Harrison Schmitt did not hold a Civil (FAA) Pilot Certificate during his flight to the moon, in fact, the only Civil Certificate Harrison holds is a Student Pilot Certificate issued on 4/18/2018. (The FAA does keep records going back to the 60s and before, see Maurice D Watson) This does not preclude the possibility he ...


4

Yes, that is it. Labeled as such in this image. From Apollo Spacecraft Pyrotechnics This picture shows that fitting between the mortars. From Apollo Experience Report, Earth Landing System There's a picture (not labeled though) showing the parachute-stowed configuration. I highlighted the first part of the risers in green. Picture from Apollo Spacecraft ...


3

The video is too low in quality to make much of but assuming the clips are not just footage from different times or launches and the move of the mobile service structure between beginning and end actually indicates a launch within 24 hours then it is possible this is Apollo 17 because the moon is still only coming into day, and the landings were timed to be ...


3

The CSAR (coherent synthetic aperture radar) did not use very high frequencies and short wavelengths like 3 GHz (0.1 m) or 30 GHz (0.01 m) allowing small narrow beam directional antennas. Very low frequencies of 5 , 15 and 150 MHz and 60 , 20 and 2 m wavelength were used. These low frequencies were selected to image not only the lunar surface but also the ...


3

I am not 100 % confident in this answer. I found an Apollo 16 image S72-36328 from ALSJ: I added green arrows to indicate three electronic boxes, a red arrow to the flashing recovery (light) beacon and two cyan arrows to recovery antennas. Figure 1-9 from the Apollo Recovery Operational Procedures Manual showing both VHF recovery antennas and the flashing ...


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