20

24 people have gone around the Moon on nine Apollo missions (8, 10-17). 3 of those 24 were repeat visitors. I'm not sure if Apollo 13 saw the sight you describe, but all of the others surely did. Apollo 13 only had one chance, and they probably had other things on their minds at that time. Although according to the official transcript, someone said "...


17

The answer is on this National Geographic page about the best pictures from NASA's official photographer Bill Ingalls: If you love space, odds are you’ve admired the work of Bill Ingalls. He has been NASA’s senior contract photographer for 30 years, a job that has taken him across the world—but not yet beyond it—to cover major moments in space exploration. ...


15

Yes, it was considered. The Command Module Pilot didn't have to die; the mere disability of the CMP was an issue. The earliest consideration of such a scenario was reported on August 25, 1964. The two major concerns were to stabilize the CSM's attitude and to turn on the docking radar transponder. The proposed solution was to allow ground control of both ...


14

I concentrate on Earthrises documented by Hasselblad images. The Apollo 8 earthrise image is part of the question. An Apollo 10 CM photo AS10-27-3888 called Earthrise from lunar orbit. Earthrise as seen from the Apollo 11 CM AS11-44-6547: Another Apollo 11 image AS11-37-5441 taken from the LM: So we got earthrise images from both the Apollo 11 LM and CM. ...


10

Apollo 7 Mission Report corroborates 72.5% of the claim on page 11-13: Approximately 290 pounds of water was found in the docking tunnel. Postflight tests show that the upper hatch vent valve leakage rate with the hatch in the stable I position was between 0.5 and 3.0 gal/min. The leakage rate with the hatch rotated 100 degrees from the stable I posi­tion ...


8

The problem and its solution is described in section 16.2.4 of the mission report. Basically, the attitude of the LM was oriented in such a way that parts of the spacecraft were in the way of the the direct path between the S-band antenna and Earth. Also, some signal reflected off the surface of the moon, causing multipath interference. To make matters ...


4

The two times are for DIFFERENT events. The CSM physically separated from the S-IVB at 003:15:23.0. The 003:17:04.6 time is for the CSM separation maneuver ignition, which, by the way, had cutoff at 003:17:11.7. These times are documented in "Apollo By The Numbers" (page 106) and "Apollo: The Definitive Sourcebook" page 321


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