18

Can someone find the descent rate profile that Duke is referring to here? Did LMPs look at a cheat sheet during the descent, or would they memorize key altitude-versus-ROD reference points? I think what you are looking for is on page 11 of the Apollo 16 LM Timeline Book. This is the checklist used by the crew during landing. The numbers in the 200 ft box ...


13

The paper "Fuel-efficient Descent and Landing Guidance Logic for a Safe Lunar Touchdown" by Allan Y. Lee, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California ( link to pdf ) contains the following plot of altitude vs altitude rate for Apollo-11: The plot is claimed to be reconstructed using flight data from the following ...


8

As a data point (but as yet, not a complete answer in itself) I came across this paper whilst reading up on satellite antennae for another question: Lunar Far Side Communication Satellites, dated June 1968. It is a NASA technical report, for whatever that's worth. It considered several tasks: relaying signals from a lunar module landed on the far side of ...


6

The photo you have is of DSS-46, which is actually at Tidbinbilla. It used to be DSS-44 at Honeysuckle Creek, but when that site was closed in 1981 the antenna was moved. When it was re-assembled in 83, a new self-supporting secondary reflector replaced the old quadripod (source). Here's a better photo of that bit: (Crop from 2005 image here by Eric Fehr) ...


5

This is a bit of a breadcrumb trail, but page 2-99 of NASA MSC-01372-1 "Apollo Operations Handbook Extra Vehicular Mobility Unit" (March 1971) discusses the power used for Apollo 15-17: The dual mode is the normal operating position of the switch. In this mode, the EVC-2 transmits a 0.3- to 2.3-kHz voice signal and two interrange instrument group (IRIG) ...


4

I found some right-facing contemporary shots of the two men (photo credits: NASA) and laid them beside the men in the ad. Top right picture is Cernan, bottom right picture is Young. My conclusion: nope.


3

If my understanding of the question is correct, the OP is asking why exactly the CSM/LM stack longitudinal axis (from nozzle bell to pointy front end) was oriented perpendicular to ecliptic plane during Passive Thermal Control (PTC) mode, when it would've been also possible to orient it within the ecliptic plane thus maintaining the line of sight with Earth ...


2

These are the best I've seen. They are from the recent restoration of the Apollo MOCR but are accurate AFAIK. Source: https://wordpress.accuweather.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/mission-control-7.jpg


2

1) In June 2007 there was a major computer failure on International Space Station, which left the station without thrusters, oxygen generation, carbon dioxide scrubber, and other environmental control systems, causing the temperature on the station to rise. The root cause of the failure was found to be [the] condensation inside the electrical ...


2

There are at least not any others in the onboard and air-to-ground transcripts, as far as I can see https://historycollection.jsc.nasa.gov/JSCHistoryPortal/history/mission_trans/AS08_TEC.PDF https://historycollection.jsc.nasa.gov/JSCHistoryPortal/history/mission_trans/AS08_CM.PDF Honeysuckle communications have been preserved and digitized, available for ...


1

The four antenna dishes were mounted at the bottom side of the Service module. For continous communication during a PTC the central roll axis of the CSM should be oriented towards the ground stations on Earth. The nozzle of the SM engine and the bottom of the SM should not pass between antennas and ground station during PTC roll to ensure continous radio ...


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