27

I'll ignore the thermal, radiation, and other considerations, and consider only the general performance characteristics of the LM. The nominal "fully automatic" descent profile for the Apollo LM required about 2080 m/s of delta-V, with a small amount of additional propellant budgeted for a manual approach and other contingencies. This is the ...


10

TL;DR He didn't I purchased One Giant Leap to research your question; a complete quote from the section you reference is here: Dave Scott was one of the main points of contact between the astronauts and MIT, and he developed great affection for the Apollo computer, and also the ability to add his own programs to it, which he did as commander of Apollo 15. &...


6

sub-partial answer... Shuttle used a table lookup method to determine which jets to fire for a desired maneuver. If the full tables are available online, I am not aware of it, but there were some examples in training material. For background on the shuttle RCS and its operations please review the following answers first: https://space.stackexchange.com/a/...


4

Partial answer to LOR 1962 ... July 11 - NASA announced that the lunar rendezvous mode would be used for the moon mission. This new plan called for development of a two-man lunar module to be used to reach the surface of the moon and return the astronauts to the lunar­ orbiting command module. NASA administrator James Webb said this method was the most ...


3

This may be of help to you: Planetary Mission Entry Vehicles Quick Reference Guide. Version 3.0. It contains lots of data on various entry probes (including ballistic coefficients) although it only goes up until 2003 (MER-A & MER-B).


3

The Apollo landings and the Falcon 9 landings are superficially similar in that landed vehicles on a large spheroidal object. The differences are huge. Apollo: No atmosphere. Falcon 9: A significant atmosphere. The Apollo vehicles didn't have to contend with a lunar atmosphere, but they also couldn't take advantage of it. The Falcon 9 first stages do have ...


3

Here is a Photograph of the KSC CMS Simulators (x2) and LMS Simulator in the Flight Crew Training Building, from 1968. I toured this building in 1971 with flight crews training in both the CMS and LMS, but cannot recall if there was more than one CMS at that time.


3

Multi-stage rocket This was already certain in the mid-to-late 1940s, if not sooner. There's no practical way to reach the moon on chemical propellants without a multistage rocket; the only alternative in that era would have been a Project Orion-style nuclear detonation rocket, which wasn't ever considered for Apollo. CM pulling the LM out of the rocket ...


1

The authoritative source of dates is The Apollo Spacecraft: A Chronology. Volume I (of the 4 volumes) ends at the spacecraft mode decision, which is what you are asking about. Volumes II and III are smaller design decisions. Volume IV starts with the Apollo 1 fire, and ends at the end of the program. Looking at the key events page: 1957 October 4: ...


1

Not knowing how much you already know about this, I'll just point out that drag coefficients at high speeds (10-25 Ma) are still Mach number dependent, though far less so than at low Mach number (less than 3 Ma). They are also dependent on air density and pressure (Reynolds effect). Most modeling takes a simplified approach and ignores much of this. Suggest ...


1

The BBC published a panorama that shows both shots: "Ball 1" is consistent with the object identified in the photo in Hobbes' answer.


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