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3

As already mention, the USS Hornet as an Aircraft Carrier had plenty of room in its hangar deck. Here on the picture shown, you can see how the command module was lashed on a special construction and how the crews quarataine was established ...


5

Yes, securing the command module on the recovery ships was considered. Every recovery ship was given a practice command module, a cradle to hold the CM (instead of lashing it down), other equipment, and training: Much special equipment was carried aboard secondary recovery ships to facilitate command module retrieval and handling. The major item on ...


2

From a NASA page: The recovery helicopter one by one retrieved the three astronauts from the raft using a Billy Pugh net, first Armstrong, then Collins and finally Aldrin. NASA flight surgeon Dr. William R. Carpentier was aboard the helicopter and gave them a brief medical evaluation. The helicopter flew to the Hornet, landing on its deck 63 minutes after ...


2

Heritage Auctions auctioned a slide rule purported to be Aldrin's for almost \$78,000. Given Aldrin's nickname of "Dr. Rendezvous" for his PhD thesis in orbital mechanics, he would seem the most likely candidate to carry the slide rule on the mission. However, there's a small hint that two slide rules might have been carried on the flight. 84 hours ...


5

A first look at: Moon Landings on Moon Map shows: beside Apollo 12 and Surveyor 3 there is just one candiate: Apollo 11. Apollo 11 is near Surveyor 5 and Ranger 8. Have a quick google check for S5: Less than two years later the first crewed landing, Apollo 11, would land 25 km south-southwest of Surveyor 5. Source Wikipedia Surveyor 5 And for R8: This ...


14

The videographer says yes! This photo is described by NASA as: The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) gets a speed workout by astronaut John W. Young in the "Grand Prix" run during the first Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Descartes landing site. This view is a frame from motion picture film exposed by a 16mm Maurer camera held by astronaut ...


4

Source: Apollo Experience Report: Spacecraft Pyrotechnic Systems Definitions: LES = launch escape system (carries the CM away during an abort) CM = command module (the main crew compartment) SM = service module (uncrewed compartment with engines, equipment, and fluids) LM = lunar module (lands on the moon) SLA = spacecraft lunar-module adapter (conical part ...


20

If the failure of the S-IVB third stage didn't significantly damage the Command/Service Module, and the CSM was able to separate from the S-IVB, then this is a surprisingly benign failure mode and the crew would be likely to return to Earth safely. Firstly, note that at all times during the TLI burn, the spacecraft trajectory is an elliptical orbit with ...


6

Almost certainly, assuming the CSM wasn't damaged. During Apollo 13, they considered (but chose not) to use "direct abort", which would have used the SM engine to return without going around the moon. A failure during TLI would have been much closer to earth, and most likely not travelling as fast.


2

There were several observations made, in radar and in visible, but none from when the spacecraft were on or near the surface of the Moon itself. Communication could be heard by third party observers, but they were far too small to actually be seen. However, it is much easier to see an object when it doesn't have a cluttered background, even if small. A ...


11

I suspect, though I cannot prove, that the photographer was using a fairly common trick for getting high-spirited groups to pose for serious photos. Promise them that you'll take a silly one as well as a serious one. If you do that, they won't play tricks like stealthy rude gestures, shifting each other's chairs, and so on when you're taking the serious ...


6

I don't have a source to point to -- I learned it from some video I checked out from the library when I was in elementary school where Charlie Duke was talking about a large number of things Apollo (if anybody has any idea what that video was, I'd love to rediscover it!). It was Ken Mattingly's wedding ring. It had gotten lost in the spacecraft at some ...


28

Ed Fendell, a controller in Houston was controlling the rover camera. It’s in the EVA-3 mission logs. https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a15/a15.clsout3.html


1

One addition to the answer by @supinf: a) The initial DOUBLE in SPT b) overflows for input x (register A) above +0.5 (+90°) and underflows for x below -0.5 (-90°). In this case, A is >+1 or <-1 and the following TS stores the corrected value (effectively add one, if it is below -1, or subtract one, if it is above +1) in TEMK and sets A to the +1 (...


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