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I don't think these answers are correct. Think of the Captain of a ship. The pilot is one who provides the specialist navigation advice. To my way of thinking Aldrin was pilot and the equipment on his side of the LEM seems to support my hypothesis. Armstrong remained Captain. I know from naval days that when entering port etc as the navigating officer I ...


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Text quoted here is from a presentation by John Burton called Introduction to Apollo Entry Guidance and Flight Performance Sorry about the giant block quote but it all seems relevant. Emphasis mine. Sounds like they defined a "skip" as the vehicle aerodynamic load falling below 0.2 g. Addressing the part of the question "Did it (the ...


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As DylanSp's answer notes, the 1201/1202 alarms were simulated, but the details of the computer overload that caused them on the Apollo 11 flight were complex, and were not specifically simulated prior to the mission. According to Mindell's Digital Apollo: The trouble was that the rendezvous radar and the rest of the guidance system had different electrical ...


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They did simulate the debugging alarms, such as the 1201 and 1202. From Apollo: The Race to the Moon*: On July 5, just eleven days before the launch, [...] the scenario included one of the computer alarms that [Jay] Honeycutt (one of the simulation supervisors) had discovered. When the alarm went off, the controllers didn't know what to do with it. The ...


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