26

The presence of gravity simplifies a number of common processes. Some examples: Separating liquids from gasses, eg. getting the water out of the air after you take a shower, or removing the hydrogen bubbles from water produced in a fuel cell. Cooling hot objects: you can use radiator fins and convective airflow rather than needing to stick cooling fans or ...


22

It would help you to learn which plants can grow properly in a greenhouse on the moon or Mars. When a seed germinates, the root starts growing downward with gravity, and the shoot grows upward to the surface of the soil. Light also helps to orient the plant, but it only works once the shoot has breached the surface of the soil. The angle of sunlight is ...


10

Having a facility to investigate the effect of variable gravity levels would be very interesting from a scientific perspective. Some of the questions that might be worth finding the answers to are: How do various plants and bacteria respond to different gravity fields? How does this effect how they grow and the crop yields for plants? How does Lunar or ...


9

We must remember that there is no spoon gravity here and that as soon as our astronaut is no longer in contact with the floor they must have an essentially straight line trajectory. Below is a simulation in an inertial frame moving towards Jupiter along with Discovery 1. Let's assume that the astronaut is initiall standing and has a tangential velocity equal ...


4

I'd assume you could essentially use it as a very large reaction wheel, so use it for station keeping/ fine control of attitude


4

Even small, relatively cheap steps haven't been taken to space Leaving aside the idea that there's such a thing as "cheap" in space: Sept. 14, 1966 - Gemini XI Artificial Gravity Experiment Gemini XI separated from the Agena with their spacecraft pointed nose-down toward the Earth. Conrad and Gordon maneuvered their craft to keep the tether taut ...


3

On a sufficiently large spin ship the result would be indistinguishable from normal gravity, at least to human perception. The idea behind a spin ship is simple: instead of gravity constantly pulling your body downward towards the ground as would happen on a planet, the ship rotates such that the floor is being constantly pulled "upward" towards ...


3

Rotating for now seems to be the only viable option for artificial gravity, and alternative is keeping a constant acceleration of g halfway through the journey, and reversing it to slow down with g on the other half, which unfortunately requires a lot of fuel. And there are a lot of effects the different gravity has on the human body, which also won't end ...


2

While @DrSheldon's answer points out that a reduced gravity simulator... ...would help you to learn which plants can grow properly in a greenhouse on the moon or Mars. A access to a long-term reduced artificial gravity field will also yield information on how people might fare on Mars. There is a lot of data on rates of bone loss and deterioration of eyes ...


2

This question brings up an area of active research and much discussion in professional circles. There is a lot of research yet to be done, mostly because as yet, nobody has been willing to pony up for the cost of actually doing experiments at true reduced-g levels. This Wikipedia article goes into a lot of the issues. There is an unavoidable link among ...


2

Tethers in general have been considered, yes. This video by Scott Manley highlights him consulting on the Netflix film Stowaway to discuss the design of a tether-based interplanetary vessel featured in the film. It's a pretty safe bet that if filmmakers are showing 'crunchy' (well-researched, technically accurate) design schemes for spacecraft, the ...


2

above: holding on. below: letting go, and immediately accelerating towards the back of the station. I’m going to let go now and here I go drifting back toward you again so the acceleration applies to me to. tl;dr They would have to hold on with a force of about 1.3 Newtons to keep in place. Background They strap everything down first (it was suggested that ...


1

(Oversize comment) Explaining why on PcMan's answer: You need a big rocket when you're dealing with gravity because you have to expend a lot of power simply dealing with gravity, if you can't produce more thrust than you weigh you're not going anywhere and beyond that you want to minimize the loss to gravity. However, once you're in orbit you aren't ...


1

Look at this image, the sparks move away tangentially from the grinding wheel. This movement is valid for the spin ship too, as long as it is possible inside the spinning ship. The jumping astronaut will move in tangential direction until he hits the floor again. I assume the circumference speed of the ship is much faster than the running speed of the ...


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