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You don't even need a telescope. You can see it with the naked eye. Is it possible to view ISS using sophisticated telescopes from planet earth? And per @GdD's comment: Given that the purpose of a telescope is to see something in more detail than the human eye alone you've answered this already. This question has no purpose.


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Answers to this can be found by examining the website's code on GitHub. Apogee and Perigee are numbers that are valid at the epoch of the active TLE for the satellite in question. They are derived from the mean motion and eccentricity values and reference plain old 6371.0 as earth radius. The altitude comes from the propagator and is in reference to the ...


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If you are already familiar with n2yo (or any other similar sites), the names of satellites you can looked for in their database for your project could be: Tianhe (~390Km) ISS (~420Km), Starlink(550Km), Iridium (740Km) Oneweb (1200Km), Globalstar (1700Km) O3b (8000Km) NAVSTAR (20200Km) Galileo (23220Km) Inmarsat(35800Km) Following @uhoh comment, the other ...


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For an astronomical view, rather than a geometrical one: The shape of an orbit and the position of a body on that orbit are defined by six orbital elements https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbital_elements I would appreciate anyone who can insert the diagram ,with attribution, from the referenced Wikipedia article) Of interest here is the true anomaly, an angle ...


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In geometry these terms are used for a circular segment: Let R be the radius of the arc which forms part of the perimeter of the segment, θ the central angle subtending the arc in radians, c the chord length, s the arc length, h the sagitta (height) of the segment, and a the area of the segment. Source So arc length is the curved distance and chord length ...


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Perhaps you are looking for a relationship in the form of (or wondering whether such a relationship exists): Nmin(A_cap,n) = μ(n) * (A_Earth/A_cap) A_cap: area of an instantaneous coverage by a single satellite, constant in time (circular orbits), modelled as a spherical cap. Nmin: smallest number of satellites in a practical constellation that can provide ...


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Some notes on your approach, which I believe is a good one as a first order approximation. Doing this I belive I'm overestimating the number of satellites I would rather say it has to be an underestimate. Circles do not perfectly tile. To achieve a 1-fold coverage, for instance, there must be some overlap, requiring $\frac{2\pi}{3\sqrt{3}} \approx 1.21$ ...


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I am the walrus. Goo goo g'joob! source tl;dr: "WWF is running the "Walrus From Space" project jointly with the British Antarctic Survey" From the BBC's Walrus counting from space: How many tusked beasts do you see?: "One of the implications of not having the sea-ice to haul out on is that we're increasingly seeing walruses spend ...


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The James Webb Space Telescope (finally scheduled to launch mid December 2021) with its folded-up sunshield and primary mirror counts as an origami spacecraft. Those structures need to unfold themselves after launch in an automated fashion. The JWST has 344 single points of failure, several of which are criticality 1, which means the vehicle is essentially ...


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It's a mixture of a number of factors, but the mechanisms required for "origami" spacecraft tend to make them heavier, more complex, more expensive and more prone to failure than a single piece spacecraft and therefore tend only to be used when necessary. Furthermore, with the exception of solar arrays, most rockets have a large enough faring that ...


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